“Who will marry a diseased girl?”: Marriage, gender and tuberculosis stigma in Asia

Article


Hatherall, B., Newell, James N, Emmel, Nick, Baral, Sushil Chandra and Khan, Muhammad Amir 2018. “Who will marry a diseased girl?”: Marriage, gender and tuberculosis stigma in Asia. Qualitative Health Research. 29 (8), pp. 1109-1119.
AuthorsHatherall, B., Newell, James N, Emmel, Nick, Baral, Sushil Chandra and Khan, Muhammad Amir
Abstract

In a qualitative study on the stigma associated with tuberculosis (TB), involving 73 interviews and eight focus groups conducted in five sites across three countries (Bangladesh, Nepal and Pakistan), participants spoke of TB’s negative impact on the marriage prospects of women in particular. Combining the approach to discovering grounded theory with a conceptualisation of causality based on a realist ontology, we developed a theory to explain the relationships between TB, gender and marriage. The mechanism at the heart of the theory is TB’s disruptiveness to the gendered roles of wife (or daughter-in-law) and mother. It is this disruptiveness which gives legitimacy to the rejection of marriage to a woman with TB. Whether or not this mechanism results in a negative impact of TB on marriage prospects depends on a range of contextual factors, providing opportunities for interventions and policies.

JournalQualitative Health Research
Journal citation29 (8), pp. 1109-1119
ISSN1049-7323
Year2018
PublisherSAGE Publications
Accepted author manuscript
File Access Level
Repository staff only
Publisher's version
License
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1177/1049732318812427
Web address (URL)https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732318812427
Publication dates
Online30 Nov 2018
Publication process dates
Deposited02 Nov 2018
Accepted18 Oct 2018
Accepted18 Oct 2018
FunderEconomic and Social Research Council
Department for International Development
Economic and Social Research Council
Department for International Development
Copyright information© 2018 The authors.
LicenseCC BY 4.0
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