Locomotor Muscle Fatigue Does Not Alter Oxygen Uptake Kinetics during High-Intensity Exercise

Article


Hopker, James G., Caporaso, Giuseppe, Azzalin, Andrea, Carpenter, R. and Marcora, Samuele M. 2016. Locomotor Muscle Fatigue Does Not Alter Oxygen Uptake Kinetics during High-Intensity Exercise. Frontiers in Physiology. 7 (463).
AuthorsHopker, James G., Caporaso, Giuseppe, Azzalin, Andrea, Carpenter, R. and Marcora, Samuele M.
Abstract

The V˙O2 slow component (V˙O2sc) that develops during high-intensity aerobic exercise is thought to be strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue. We sought to experimentally test this hypothesis by pre-fatiguing the locomotor muscles used during subsequent high-intensity cycling exercise. Over two separate visits, eight healthy male participants were asked to either perform a non-metabolically stressful 100 intermittent drop-jumps protocol (pre-fatigue condition) or rest for 33 min (control condition) according to a random and counterbalanced order. Locomotor muscle fatigue was quantified with 6-s maximal sprints at a fixed pedaling cadence of 90 rev·min−1. Oxygen kinetics and other responses (heart rate, capillary blood lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion, RPE) were measured during two subsequent bouts of 6 min cycling exercise at 50% of the delta between the lactate threshold and V˙O2max determined during a preliminary incremental exercise test. All tests were performed on the same cycle ergometer. Despite significant locomotor muscle fatigue (P = 0.03), the V˙O2sc was not significantly different between the pre-fatigue (464 ± 301 mL·min−1) and the control (556 ± 223 mL·min−1) condition (P = 0.50). Blood lactate response was not significantly different between conditions (P = 0.48) but RPE was significantly higher following the pre-fatiguing exercise protocol compared with the control condition (P < 0.01) suggesting higher muscle recruitment. These results demonstrate experimentally that locomotor muscle fatigue does not significantly alter the V˙O2 kinetic response to high intensity aerobic exercise, and challenge the hypothesis that the V˙O2sc is strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue.

Keywordslocomotor muscle fatigue; slow component; efficiency; power output; aerobic exercise; cycling
JournalFrontiers in Physiology
Journal citation7 (463)
ISSN1664-042X
Year2016
PublisherFrontiers Media
Publisher's version
License
CC BY
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.3389/fphys.2016.00463
Publication dates
Print13 Oct 2016
Publication process dates
Deposited03 Nov 2016
Accepted27 Sep 2016
Copyright information© 2016 The Authors. This document is protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. It is reproduced with permission.
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