Fighting Talk: The Statements of 'The IRA/New IRA'

Article


Morrison, J. 2016. Fighting Talk: The Statements of 'The IRA/New IRA'. Terrorism and Political Violence. 28 (3), pp. 598-619.
AuthorsMorrison, J.
Abstract

With the advent of the new violent dissident merger, ‘The IRA/New IRA’, the group and its affiliates have had to legitimise their new existence. They have utilised the maintenance of paramilitary activity to achieve this. However, they have also produced a number of organisational statements, justifying their position, tactics and strategies. This article analyses the evolution of these statements, both pre and post-merger from 2007 to 2015. 126 individual statements and 4 magazines are analysed using grounded theory. This analysis found that the statements have a dual strategy, aiming to foster trust in the movement and distrust in their perceived enemies. One of the dominant ways in which the group aims to foster trust, is by proposing their possession of an historical mandate from the republican forefathers of 1916, as well as the internally lauded paramilitaries from the Troubles era PIRA. The focus of the distrust narrative has been on the ‘constitutional nationalism’ of Sinn Féin. However, it also pours scorn on the PSNI, and capitalism, across the island of Ireland. The analysis of these statements can provide us with an understanding of the future direction of the group, as well as giving us insight, which can inform the development of any counter-narrative.

KeywordsTerrorism; Statements; IRA; Dissident Republicans; Northern Ireland
JournalTerrorism and Political Violence
Journal citation28 (3), pp. 598-619
ISSN0954-6553
Year2016
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Accepted author manuscript
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1080/09546553.2016.1155941
Web address (URL)http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09546553.2016.1155941
Publication dates
Print19 Apr 2016
Publication process dates
Deposited14 Mar 2016
Copyright informationThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Terrorism and Political Violence on 19.04.16, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09546553.2016.1155941
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