'The heart has its reasons that reason knows nothing of': the role of the unconscious in career decision making

Article


Yates, J. 2015. 'The heart has its reasons that reason knows nothing of': the role of the unconscious in career decision making. Journal of the National Institute for Career and Education Counselling. 35 (1), pp. 28-35.
AuthorsYates, J.
Abstract

The complexity of career paths in the 21st century
has led to a rise in the number of career changes in
a typical working life. Effective career practitioners,
therefore, should have a good understanding of the
process of career choice. One aspect of decision
making which has attracted attention in the literature
is the role of the unconscious or gut instinct. Once
considered best ignored, its potency and value are
now recognised. Drawing from decision theory,
cognitive neuroscience and behavioural economics,
this paper summarises evidence of the most common
and effective decision making strategies used in career
choice, and considers the implications for practice.

JournalJournal of the National Institute for Career and Education Counselling
Journal citation35 (1), pp. 28-35
ISSN2046-1348
Year2015
PublisherNational Institute for Career Education and Counselling
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY
Publication dates
Print01 Oct 2015
Publication process dates
Deposited26 Oct 2015
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https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/85473

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