Protection, assistance and social (re)integration of human trafficking survivors: a comparative analysis of policy approaches and practices in the UK and in Italy

Working paper


Andreatta, Cristina 2015. Protection, assistance and social (re)integration of human trafficking survivors: a comparative analysis of policy approaches and practices in the UK and in Italy. University of East London, Centre for Social Justice and Change. doi:10.15123/PUB.4054
AuthorsAndreatta, Cristina
TypeWorking paper
Abstract

In recent years, human trafficking has become a significant international concern that affects most countries across the world. The ILO (2012) estimates that on a global level there currently are over 20 million people, trapped in highly abusive working and living conditions, often victims of sexual and/or labour exploitation. Most of them are migrants, who have been lured into trafficking with the false promise of a better life elsewhere.
In an attempt to respond to this global phenomenon, the international community has adopted numerous protocols and conventions aimed at effectively combating human trafficking. As a result of these endeavours, a victim-centred approach that recognises the importance of protecting the human rights of the victims has been promoted and to different extents enforced across the world, including in Europe.
The aim of this qualitative research was to compare the Italian and British models for assisting trafficking survivors, with a view to establish whether they are compliant with key international obligations and geared towards fostering the long-term social and financial reintegration of the victims. Overall, this study has recognised that many legal and practical steps have so far been taken in both countries to protect and assist trafficked persons. Nevertheless, more remains to be done to ensure that supporting victims, for as long as they need to fully regain control over their lives, is treated as a political priority and enforced beyond any immigration and law enforcement concerns.

Year2015
PublisherUniversity of East London, Centre for Social Justice and Change
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.15123/PUB.4054
Publication dates
Print17 Feb 2015
Publication process dates
Deposited17 Feb 2015
Copyright holderUniversity of East London
Copyright information© University of East London 2015. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Series Working Papers
Publisher's version
License
CC BY
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