Evoking the sublime: Absence and presence in live electroacoustic performance

Article


Harries, G. 2014. Evoking the sublime: Absence and presence in live electroacoustic performance. Interference. 4.
AuthorsHarries, G.
Abstract

Live electroacoustic performance juxtaposes two main elements: the real, present and physical, against the simulated and disembodied. The relationship between the two, one of ambiguity, dissonance, or unexplained connections, can create poetic affect. Two such affects will be discussed here: the uncanny and the sublime. Using an interdisciplinary approach, I will explore these themes in the context of ritual and performance traditions as well as critical studies, and will apply them to the electroacoustic case. I will distinguish between several types of ‘absence’: evoked absentees, partial absences and doubles. I will refer to Brook’s ‘holy theatre’, Chion’s ‘acousmêtre’ and Link’s discussion of silence. I will also show how ‘absence’ has been used expressively in the works of Lynch, Dodge, Ostertag, and Crumb as well as my own work

Keywordselectroacoustic music; live electronics; dramaturgy; musical performance; sublime; performance theory; audiovisual art
JournalInterference
Journal citation4
Year2014
PublisherTrinitiy College Dublin, Graduate School of Creative Arts and Media
Publisher's version
License
CC BY
Web address (URL)http://www.interferencejournal.com/articles/sound-methods/evoking-the-sublime-absence-and-presence-in-live-electroacoustic-performance
Publication dates
PrintMay 2014
Publication process dates
Deposited30 May 2014
Copyright information© Guy Harries 2014. Issued under Creative Commons Attribution CC-BY licence. First published in the journal Interference .
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