Romanticism and the Problem of Capitalism in Post-­War British Film

Discussion paper


Dave, P. 2013. Romanticism and the Problem of Capitalism in Post-­War British Film. University of East London.
AuthorsDave, P.
TypeDiscussion paper
Abstract

This article provides a historical materialist approach
to changing and opposed forms of romanticism in post-­‐war British film culture. Using Michael Löwy and Robert Sayre’s definition of European romanticism as ‘a critique of modernity, that is, of modern capitalist civilization, in the name of values and ideals drawn from the past (the precapitalist, premodern past)’, it mobilizes their typology of romantic cultural politics in order to compare the work of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s A Canterbury Tale (1944); Peter Jackson’s trilogy The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Two Towers (2002) and The Return of the King (2003); and Patrick Keiller’s concluding film in the Robinson trilogy, Robinson in Ruins (2010) (Löwy and Sayre, 2001, p. 17). These films, I argue, can be read respectively as articulations of conservative romanticism, restitutionalist romanticism and revolutionary romanticism. In developing these readings the article contributes to the literature on romanticism and film while introducing important distinctions between different forms of romanticism.

Year2013
PublisherUniversity of East London
Publication dates
Print18 Nov 2013
Publication process dates
Deposited19 Nov 2013
Copyright holder© Paul Dave 2013
Publisher's version
License
CC BY-NC-ND
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https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/85vxy

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