What are the barriers to non-medical residential crisis support being developed and utilised to support people experiencing psychosis?

Prof Doc Thesis


Williams, Emma 2011. What are the barriers to non-medical residential crisis support being developed and utilised to support people experiencing psychosis? Prof Doc Thesis University of East London School of Psychology
AuthorsWilliams, Emma
TypeProf Doc Thesis
Abstract

This study sought to investigate the barriers to non-medical residential crisis support
being developed and utilised for people experiencing psychosis. One to one
interviews were carried out with professionals and commissioners involved in the
planning, development and provision of services for this service user group. A
grounded theory approach was utilised for the analysis of the data collected, which
led to the generation of categories and subcategories to begin to develop a
theoretical understanding that would answer the research questions of this study.
Questions focused on the crisis support options available to people experiencing
psychosis.
The findings of this study suggest that service development is heavily influenced by
socio-political factors, such as the agenda of social control and preferences for
individual treatment, as well as the stigma and lack of hope that surrounds people
experiencing psychosis. For more alternative services to be supported there is a
need for collective movements to influence service provision on a broader level, so
that such support could be more widely available within statutory services as well as
non-statutory organisations.

Year2011
Publication dates
PrintSep 2011
Publication process dates
Deposited12 Jun 2014
Additional information

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