An exploration of the construction of gender identity disorders in children and young people in the popular press.

Prof Doc Thesis


Patricio, Ines Cyrne 2011. An exploration of the construction of gender identity disorders in children and young people in the popular press. Prof Doc Thesis University of East London School of Psychology
AuthorsPatricio, Ines Cyrne
TypeProf Doc Thesis
Abstract

This study examines the portrayals of gender identity issues in children and young people in popular U.K. newspapers and magazines published between January 2008 and January 2011. Seventy-five media articles were selected and analysed using thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006) within a social constructionist framework. Ten themes and eleven sub-themes were developed. Findings indicate that expressions of gender variance were predominantly constructed as a medical condition, equated to a physical illness, and with an underlying biological aetiology, that warranted medical intervention. Emphasis was placed on gender stereotypical behaviours and characteristics to justify how these children and young people did not conform to the 'natural' gender norms. Further, gender variance was negatively connoted and depicted as not a valued aspect of human diversity. Furthermore, a lack of clarity and consistency in the use of the terms 'sex' and 'gender’ was found. The findings are integrated with the wider literature and its implications discussed. The findings illustrate the far reaching powerful messages that are distributed by the media, and the need to critically acknowledge and address their impact on gender variant children and young people and their families.

Keywordsgender identity; popular press
Year2011
Publication dates
PrintMay 2011
Publication process dates
Deposited28 Apr 2013
Additional information

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