An integrative study of differing relational patterns produced around the experience of disappointment: Theoretical and clinical implications of the distinctive significance and nature of the role of disappointment in the schizoid and depressive processes during childhood development

Prof Doc Thesis


Sanderson, Nicholas Andrew 2010. An integrative study of differing relational patterns produced around the experience of disappointment: Theoretical and clinical implications of the distinctive significance and nature of the role of disappointment in the schizoid and depressive processes during childhood development. Prof Doc Thesis University of East London School of Psychology
AuthorsSanderson, Nicholas Andrew
TypeProf Doc Thesis
Abstract

The subject of this thesis is the child's experience of the disappointment of its wishes
during the early, most formative years of its psychological development. This is a
common area of study in psychoanalytic developmental theories and a range of these
established understandings will be discussed. My research on the child's experience
of disappointment, which is presented in the context of these previous theories,
endeavours to be original, however, by attempting to establish whether or not the
experience is, in the context of the Kleinian object relational understanding of
childhood development, significant in a way that has yet to be fully considered.
In order to research whether my particular arguments, as to the importance of a
child's disappointment, might be valid or not, I firstly explore the experience from
the perspective of the relevant psychoanalytical literature on child developmental
theory. From this position, I am then able to present my own series of theoretical
arguments, and it is from these that a set of hypotheses, about the meaning of
disappointment in childhood development, are then able to be proposed. Following
this, the thesis describes my examination of these hypotheses by some preliminary
clinical research. The overall findings of this research are then presented and applied
in support of my theoretical arguments.

Year2010
Publication dates
PrintJun 2010
Publication process dates
Deposited09 Jun 2014
Additional information

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