Investigating the relationship between black men's conceptions of wellbeing, subject positions and help-seeking behaviour

Prof Doc Thesis


Myrie, Chanelle Violet 2010. Investigating the relationship between black men's conceptions of wellbeing, subject positions and help-seeking behaviour. Prof Doc Thesis University of East London School of Psychology
AuthorsMyrie, Chanelle Violet
TypeProf Doc Thesis
Abstract

Longstanding inequalities have existed for Black men in mental health care
service provision, with Black men being over-represented at the coercive end
of the mental health system but under-represented in terms of seeking help
voluntarily. An understanding of the social context of Black men, as well as
Black men's conceptions of wellbeing and help-seeking may be useful in
developing more accessible services. Nine Black men were interviewed and
their transcripts analysed using Foucauldian discourse analysis. Four
discourses were identified; discourses of oppression and discrimination,
discourses of Black masculinities, discourses of communities and discourses
of professional systems. Discourses of oppression and discrimination were
identified as influential to the other three discourses. These discourses are
discussed in the context of Black men's conceptions of wellbeing and helpseeking.
Links to how these discourses act to subjugate help-seeking
practices are highlighted. Implications of the results are discussed at the
policy, service, clinical and research level.

Year2010
Publication dates
PrintMay 2010
Publication process dates
Deposited12 Jun 2014
Additional information

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