Exploring the future for children experiencing parental death

Prof Doc Thesis


Draper, Ana 2008. Exploring the future for children experiencing parental death. Prof Doc Thesis University of East London School of Psychology
AuthorsDraper, Ana
TypeProf Doc Thesis
Abstract

This thesis explores associations that could have an impact on the experience of a
parental death in childhood. It suggests a methodology for establishing the prevalence of
parental bereavement that helps the author to explore quantitatively any associated links
between parental death in childhood and delinquency rates in 16-year-olds. As well as
helping to establish the prevalence of parental death in childhood, the methodology also
enables the author to explore possible contributing factors that could increase a child's
vulnerability to the experience of parental death such as social class, age and gender of
child and dead parent these are presented as a set of risk variables in which the data
shows an increase in a parentally bereaved child's susceptibility to delinquent behaviour.
It also compares themes within essays written by parentally bereaved children and none
parentally bereaved children. The exploration used the Thematic Apparition Test coding
as a framework from which to identify differences in the stories told about the future by
each comparison group.

Year2008
Publication dates
PrintDec 2008
Publication process dates
Deposited30 Jun 2014
Additional information

This thesis supplied via ROAR to UEL-registered users is protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights, and duplication of any part of the material is not permitted, except for your personal use for the purposes of non-commercial research and private study in electronic or print form. You must obtain permission from the copyright-holder for any other use. Electronic or print copies may not be offered, for sale or otherwise, to anyone. No quotation from the thesis may be published without proper acknowledgement.

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https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/864q1

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