New Utopia

Prof Doc Thesis


Matsubara, Mayumi 2008. New Utopia. Prof Doc Thesis University of East London University of East London
AuthorsMatsubara, Mayumi
TypeProf Doc Thesis
Abstract

When I observed Japan from a distance for the first time, I found a
similarity between Japanese society and the idea of 'Utopia, 1 and I
became interested in society as subject matter. Researching Plato and
Thomas More's ideas of 'utopia 1 was the starting point of my research.
When I realized Utopia is indeed a place without freedom, I became
interested in the other 'possible world/ a world different from our reality.
I have been obsessed with the idea, and I began making artworks related
to the idea. 'Heterotopia 1 seemed to have a strong connection with the
'possible world, 1 and Michel Foucault became essential for my theoretical
study. I spent a year researching on the theory, which later became the
foundation of my studio practice.
Along with these theoretical studies, I researched photographs of
children which were related to the subject of my digital practice. By
analyzing the work, I developed and understanding my practice. I
improved the interdisciplinary aspects of my work by researching related
artworks and films, and developed advanced techniques in digital media
and collage. After studying the theory and writing the proposal for the
Professional Doctorate programme, I found it difficult time for me to
organize my ideas and relate these thoughts to my practice. The critical
reviews helped me to reconsider my work and its presentation. While
concentrating on my study and practice, I collaborated with other artists
and designers in professional practice. I also curated a group exhibition, and the experience expanded my art practice in a new way. [Taken from Introduction in absence of an abstract]

Year2008
Publication dates
Print13 Jul 2008
Publication process dates
Deposited01 Aug 2014
Additional information

This thesis supplied via ROAR to UEL-registered users is protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights, and duplication of any part of the material is not permitted, except for your personal use for the purposes of non-commercial research and private study in electronic or print form. You must obtain permission from the copyright-holder for any other use. Electronic or print copies may not be offered, for sale or otherwise, to anyone. No quotation from the thesis may be published without proper acknowledgement.

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