Fathers' experiences of having a premature baby

Prof Doc Thesis


Shah, Bunsi 2007. Fathers' experiences of having a premature baby. Prof Doc Thesis University of East London School of Psychology
AuthorsShah, Bunsi
TypeProf Doc Thesis
Abstract

This research explored the fathers' experiences of having a premature baby. This
included their experiences both during the baby's admission to neonatal care and
following discharge from the hospital. The aims were to elicit their subjective accounts in
order to gain further insight into the phenomena and improve clinical practice.
This research employed a qualitative methodology and seven participants took part in the
research. Participants were interviewed using a semi-structured interview design and the
interviews were tape recorded. An interpretative phenomenological approach was used to
analyse the data. The analysis revealed three superordinate themes: Uncertainty and
coping, Fatherhood and Changes. A number of subordinate themes are also identified.
An important feature of the experiences described by fathers was the uncertainty and
powerlessness they experienced over a prolonged period of time as a consequence of the
critical condition of their baby. In addition, the fathers were required to fulfil a number
of competing roles and expectations. A key strategy described by all was to simply "get
on with it". However, all fathers described the distress and sense of loss they experienced
as a consequence of being separated from their baby. Yet an important finding was that in
the context of loss the fathers reported that the trauma of early birth and the difficulties
experienced by their baby appeared to be a catalyst for greater involvement.

Year2007
Publication dates
PrintMay 2007
Publication process dates
Deposited15 Jul 2014
Additional information

This thesis supplied via ROAR to UEL-registered users is protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights, and duplication of any part of the material is not permitted, except for your personal use for the purposes of non-commercial research and private study in electronic or print form. You must obtain permission from the copyright-holder for any other use. Electronic or print copies may not be offered, for sale or otherwise, to anyone. No quotation from the thesis may be published without proper acknowledgement.

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