An inquiry into mindfulness based cognitive therapy for depression in a Buddhist setting.

Prof Doc Thesis


Sherlock, Ella J 2007. An inquiry into mindfulness based cognitive therapy for depression in a Buddhist setting. Prof Doc Thesis University of East London
AuthorsSherlock, Ella J
TypeProf Doc Thesis
Abstract

This study explores the experiences of people practicing Mindfulness Based
Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) for depression in a Buddhist setting. Interpretive
Phenomenological Analysis was employed to examine the following research
questions:
1. How do people with self-defined depression report their experiences of
practicing Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy in a Buddhist setting?
2. How can their reports inform current clinical practice and service provision
within NHS settings?.
3. How can their reports inform the practice of clinical psychologists running
MBCT groups in NHS settings?
The analysis produced three master themes: 1) What it's all about - The key
ingredients of MBCT, 2) This is doing me good! - The main benefits and 3)
Could this work `on the National Health'? -A vision for an MBCT course in the
NHS: right person, right time, right place.
The study did not find a definitive answer as to whether MBCT hosted by the
NHS can produce benefits; rather it showed that nearly all the participants
attending MBCT in a Buddhist context experienced benefits in relation to the
course. They reported mixed experiences as to whether MBCT would transfer
into a secular setting. The findings sharpen questions for future research,
such as who will benefit from MBCT in a Buddhist setting and who will benefit
in the NHS?

KeywordsMindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT); depression
Year2007
Web address (URL)http://hdl.handle.net/10552/1241
File
File Access Level
Registered users only
Publication dates
Print2007
Publication process dates
Deposited09 May 2011
Additional information

This thesis supplied via ROAR to UEL-registered users is protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights, and duplication of any part of the material is not permitted, except for your personal use for the purposes of non-commercial research and private study in electronic or print form. You must obtain permission from the copyright-holder for any other use. Electronic or print copies may not be offered, for sale or otherwise, to anyone. No quotation from the thesis may be published without proper acknowledgement.

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