Understanding a mental health problem: How are the views of their local faith community and those of the NHS mental health staff caring for them, experienced by Christian service-users

Prof Doc Thesis


Little, Julia 2006. Understanding a mental health problem: How are the views of their local faith community and those of the NHS mental health staff caring for them, experienced by Christian service-users. Prof Doc Thesis University of East London School of Psychology
AuthorsLittle, Julia
TypeProf Doc Thesis
Abstract

This research used an Interpretative Phenomenological Approach to explore how
Christians, who have had an inpatient mental health admission, experience the views
of their local faith community and those of their NHS mental health staff caring for
them. I recruited eight participants (six female and two male) and interviewed them
using a semi-structured interview format. The analysis suggests that participants
could experience both the church and the mental health systems positively, as a
"sanctuary", or negatively, as a "prison." Participants gave accounts of both the
church and the mental health system providing explanations for their experiences.
These explanations ranged from participants' experiences being perceived as entirely
spiritual, entirely psychiatric or an integration of the two. The analysis described how
participants wanted to make sense of their experiences and that they developed their
explanations through the process of coming into contact with the church and the
mental health system. The analysis suggests that participants actively navigated their
way through these systems in order to seek out the "sanctuary" experiences and avoid
the "prison" experiences, primarily through the way that they would choose to
disclose or keep information hidden. The possible reasons for the "prison"
experiences and ways in which both the church and the medical system can be
experienced as "sanctuary" are explored further. Areas for further research are
identified.

Year2006
Publication dates
PrintMay 2006
Publication process dates
Deposited15 Jul 2014
Additional information

This thesis supplied via ROAR to UEL-registered users is protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights, and duplication of any part of the material is not permitted, except for your personal use for the purposes of non-commercial research and private study in electronic or print form. You must obtain permission from the copyright-holder for any other use. Electronic or print copies may not be offered, for sale or otherwise, to anyone. No quotation from the thesis may be published without proper acknowledgement.

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https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/86733

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