The adolescent experiences of individuals who later develop psychosis

Prof Doc Thesis


Medoro, Luigi 2005. The adolescent experiences of individuals who later develop psychosis. Prof Doc Thesis University of East London School of Psychology
AuthorsMedoro, Luigi
TypeProf Doc Thesis
Abstract

This study aimed to explore the adolescent experiences of individuals that later
develop psychosis. This included the nature of their relationships, how such
relationships may have influenced the way individuals saw themselves and others,
and how individuals experienced their life situation just prior to the onset of their
psychotic experiences. This study was in response to the recent dearth of research
exploring individuals' experiences of such interactions. Six individuals who
experienced psychosis were interviewed and transcripts of their interviews were
analysed using the qualitative methodology of Interpretative Phenomenological
Analysis (IPA). From their responses, it appeared that the adolescent experienced
intense resistance from their parents to their attempts to assert independence.
Adolescents were confused and frightened by their parents' behaviour, which
undermined their ability to respond. This contributed to a breakdown in
communication, resulting in a deteriorating relationship with parents and, in some
cases, with peers and siblings. Adolescents' thwarted independence, in turn,
appeared to creat a crisis in identity. Such interactions appeared to occur within a
family context characterised by conflict, confusion and emotional distance. When
individuals began to experience psychosis, it was usually preceded by events that
result in the adolescents negatively appraising themselves. The theoretical, clinical
and research implications of these findings were then discussed.

Year2005
Publication dates
PrintSep 2005
Publication process dates
Deposited02 Jul 2014
Additional information

This thesis supplied via ROAR to UEL-registered users is protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights, and duplication of any part of the material is not permitted, except for your personal use for the purposes of non-commercial research and private study in electronic or print form. You must obtain permission from the copyright-holder for any other use. Electronic or print copies may not be offered, for sale or otherwise, to anyone. No quotation from the thesis may be published without proper acknowledgement.

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