Can Participation in a Shared Reading Activity Produce Relational Benefits Between Foster Carers and the Children in Their Care?

Prof Doc Thesis


Bell, D. 2020. Can Participation in a Shared Reading Activity Produce Relational Benefits Between Foster Carers and the Children in Their Care? Prof Doc Thesis University of East London School of Psychology https://doi.org/10.15123/uel.887yy
AuthorsBell, D.
TypeProf Doc Thesis
Abstract

As a population, children in care (CiC) are found to be at an increased risk of a range of negative outcomes associated with poor educational attainment and difficult early attachment relationships. Having access to educational interventions in key areas such as literacy and the opportunity to develop positive, stable and caring relationships is seen as crucial to overcoming many of these disadvantages. Professionals supporting CiC, including those within the area of special educational needs and disability (SENDs), are duty bound to work together towards this aim. Paired reading is an educational intervention that has been used within the researcher’s local authority (LA) for several years and is credited with helping children, including foster children, achieve significant improvements in their reading. In addition, feedback from participants and some research (Forsman, 2017; Osborne, Alfano & Winn, 2010) into the efficacy of this intervention has suggested that participation might also benefit the foster carer/child relationship. In this qualitative study, semi-structured interviews were used to obtain and explore foster carers and children’s views of a shared reading (SR) intervention with respect to its impact on their relationship. Additional techniques were also adapted and used to support the children to express their views. Thematic analysis identified five key themes supportive of previous findings which suggest SR interventions can enhance the relationship between foster carers and foster children. Results also suggest, however, that more needs to be done to emphasise the relational benefits to potential participants. This research makes an important contribution to the understanding of SR practices and informs the promotion, recommendation and delivery of future interventions and the work of Educational Psychologists (EPs) and other professionals supporting this particularly vulnerable group of children.

Keywordsrelational benefits; shared reading; foster carers; foster children
Year2020
PublisherUniversity of East London
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.15123/uel.887yy
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Publication dates
PrintApr 2020
Publication process dates
Deposited29 Sep 2020
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