Techno-Securitisation of Everyday Life and Cultures of Surveillance-Apatheia

Article


Ellis, D. 2019. Techno-Securitisation of Everyday Life and Cultures of Surveillance-Apatheia. Science as Culture. 29 (1), pp. 11-29.
AuthorsEllis, D.
Abstract

As a result of digital technologies and the internet becoming increasingly ubiquitous, security technologies and surveillance systems are progressively encroaching upon peoples’ privacy. Yet concerns about this appear to be relatively muted. Why is this the case? Is the public generally indifferent about it or perhaps silently in agreement with its increased presence? As techno-security systems are becoming increasingly complex, multiple, normative, hardly recognisable, often covert and all encompassing, positioning oneself in relation to them can be a difficult process. Hence the techno-securitisation of everyday life has psychological effects which are multiple and largely unconscious. Indeed, we are all somewhat uncertain about the spin-offs of surveillance technologies and practices – in terms of their capabilities, who has access to the data they produce, and the ways that they might affect subjectivity. Rather than being plainly indifferent or silently consenting to increased techno-securitisation, some participants in this study developed an attitude of surveillance-apatheia. They tended to state that ‘as there is no avoiding these systems and not much one can do about them, why consciously worry about them?’ This attitude is not necessarily a lack of interest, but rather a way of managing associated undesirable affects, feelings and emotions.

JournalScience as Culture
Journal citation29 (1), pp. 11-29
ISSN0950-5431
Year2019
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Accepted author manuscript
License
File Access Level
Anyone
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1080/09505431.2018.1561660
Web address (URL)https://doi.org/10.1080/09505431.2018.1561660
Publication dates
Online03 Jan 2019
Publication process dates
Deposited11 Jan 2019
Accepted15 Dec 2018
Accepted15 Dec 2018
Copyright holder© 2019 Taylor & Francis
Copyright informationThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Science as Culture on 03/01/2019, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09505431.2018.1561660.
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