The effects of custom-made compression garments on recovery and performance parameters after high intensity running

Article


Bolessa, Jordon and Galbraith, A. 2018. The effects of custom-made compression garments on recovery and performance parameters after high intensity running. Graduate Journal of Sport, Exercise & Physical Education Research. 8 (S1), p. S35.
AuthorsBolessa, Jordon and Galbraith, A.
Abstract

Returning to optimal performance can be achieved through balancing training stress and recovery (Kellmann [2010]. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 20, 95-102). Insufficient recovery can leave individuals feeling muscle pain and discomfort (DOMS), lasting for up to 5-7 days after exercise (Valle et al [2013] Muscles Ligaments Tendons Journal, 3, 295–302). In recent years, interest in compression garments (CG) has grown as a non-invasive recovery modality. CG create an external pressure gradient, reducing space for swelling thus reducing muscle damage (Jimenez et al [2016] Physiology and Behaviour, 153, 133-148). CG have also been found to improve performance through improved blood flow to the muscles (Hill et al [2013] British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48, 1340-6). Previous research has focused on ‘off-the-shelf’ CG, with limited research of made-to-measure CG, tailored to fit the individual athlete. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of made-to-measure CG on performance and recovery indicators, during and after high intensity running. Eleven recreationally trained runners performed two time to exhaustion treadmill trials (TTE) at 110% of their identified critical speed. One trial was performed in running shorts and the other in compression garments. Trials were presented in a counter-balanced order. CG were a full-length lower limb design, custom made to each participant (Kurio Compression, Nottinghamshire, UK). Performance CG were worn during the trial and recovery CG were worn for 12 hours, immediately after the completion of the CG trial. A variation in applied pressure distinguished between the garments. TTE, pre and post blood [lactate] and running economy were recorded. Participants recorded their perceived level of DOMS through a visual analogue scale (VAS), pre, post, 12hr and 24hr after running trials, thus assessing recovery. TTE was significantly improved (P=0.01; d=0.39) when wearing CG (687±254s vs 599±189s), along with a reduced perception of DOMS after 12hr (14.4±12.9mm vs 22.7±15.2mm; P=0.01; d=0.59) and 24hr (5.8±6.0mm vs 13.27±11.9mm; P=0.01; d=0.79). No significant differences between conditions, in response to the running trial, were found in blood [lactate] or heart rate, however a small effect (38.89±11.6ml.kg.min vs 42.6±10.2ml.kg.min; g=0.34) for improved running economy was reported during the CG trial. This data confirms CG improved high intensity running performance and recovery, however mechanisms remain somewhat unclear. It should be noted that improvements might be a result of individual’s self-belief or a potential placebo effect.

JournalGraduate Journal of Sport, Exercise & Physical Education Research
Journal citation8 (S1), p. S35
ISSN2046-9357
Year2018
PublisherUniversity of Worcester
Publisher's version
License
CC BY-NC-ND
Web address (URL)https://www.worc.ac.uk/gjseper/668.htm
Publication dates
Online01 Jun 2018
Publication process dates
Deposited06 Aug 2018
Accepted01 May 2018
Accepted01 May 2018
Copyright information© 2018 The authors
LicenseCC BY-NC-ND 3.0
Permalink -

https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/847y5

  • 5
    total views
  • 4
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 2
    downloads this month

Related outputs

Comparison of Critical Speed and D' Derived From 2 or 3 Maximal Tests
Kordi, Mehdi, Menzies, Campbell and Galbraith, A. 2018. Comparison of Critical Speed and D' Derived From 2 or 3 Maximal Tests. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. 14 (5), pp. 685-688.
Transition phase clothing strategies and their effect on body temperature and 100-m swimming performance
Galbraith, A. and Willmott, Aimee 2017. Transition phase clothing strategies and their effect on body temperature and 100-m swimming performance. European Journal Of Sport Science. 18 (2), pp. 182-189.
A Single-Visit Field Test of Critical Speed
Galbraith, A., Hopker, James, Lelliott, Stephen, Diddams, Louise and Passfield, Louis 2014. A Single-Visit Field Test of Critical Speed. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. 9 (6), pp. 931-935.
The validity and reliability of a commercially available GPS device during running and cycling
Galbraith, A., Isikgun, Volkan and Hopker, James 2016. The validity and reliability of a commercially available GPS device during running and cycling. Journal of Sports Sciences. 34 (sup1), p. 73.
A 1-Year Study of Endurance Runners: Training, Laboratory Tests, and Field Tests
Galbraith, A., Hopker, James, Cardinale, Marco, Cunniffe, Brian and Passfield, Louis 2014. A 1-Year Study of Endurance Runners: Training, Laboratory Tests, and Field Tests. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. 9 (6), pp. 1019-1025.
Modeling Intermittent Running from a Single-visit Field Test
Galbraith, A., Hopker, James and Passfield, Louis 2015. Modeling Intermittent Running from a Single-visit Field Test. International Journal Of Sports Medicine. 36 (5), pp. 365-370.