Disaster preparedness, adaptive politics and lifelong learning: a case of Japan

Article


Kitagawa, K. 2016. Disaster preparedness, adaptive politics and lifelong learning: a case of Japan. International Journal of Lifelong Education. 35 (6), pp. 629-647.
AuthorsKitagawa, K.
Abstract

Preparedness for disaster scenarios is progressively becoming an educational agenda for governments because of diversifying risks and threats worldwide. In disaster-prone Japan, disaster preparedness has been a prioritised national agenda, and preparedness education has been undertaken in both formal schooling and lifelong learning settings. This article examines the politics behind one prevailing policy discourse in the field of disaster preparedness referred to as ‘the four forms of aid’ – ‘kojo [public aid]’, ‘jijo [self-help]’, ‘gojo/kyojo [mutual aid]’. The study looks at the Japanese case, however, the significance is global, given that neo-liberal governments are increasingly having to deal with a range of disaster situations whether floods or terrorism, while implementing austerity measures. Drawing on the theory of the adaptiveness of neo-liberalism, the article sheds light on the hybridity of the current Abe government’s politics: a ‘dominant’ neo-liberal economic approach – public aid and self-help – and a ‘subordinate’ moral conservative agenda – mutual aid. It is argued that the four forms of aid are an effective ‘balancing act’, and that kyojo in particular is a powerful legitimator in the hybrid politics. The article concludes that a lifelong and life-wide preparedness model could be developed in Japan which has taken a social approach to lifelong learning. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

KeywordsDisaster preparedness; lifelong learning in Japan; preparedness education; the adaptiveness of neo-liberalism; the hybrid politics
JournalInternational Journal of Lifelong Education
Journal citation35 (6), pp. 629-647
ISSN0260-1370
1464-519X
Year2016
PublisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)
Accepted author manuscript
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1080/02601370.2016.1231230
Publication dates
Print20 Sep 2016
Publication process dates
Deposited16 Sep 2016
Accepted31 Aug 2016
FunderEconomic and Social Research Council
Economic and Social Research Council
Copyright informationThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Lifelong Education on 20/09/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/02601370.2016.1231230
LicenseAll rights reserved (under embargo)
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