Life after Stroke: Coping mechanisms among African Caribbean Women

Article


Moorley, Calvin R., Cahill, S. and Corcoran, Nova T. 2015. Life after Stroke: Coping mechanisms among African Caribbean Women. Health and Social Care in the Community. 24 (6), pp. 769-778.
AuthorsMoorley, Calvin R., Cahill, S. and Corcoran, Nova T.
Abstract

In the UK stroke is the third most common cause of death for women and the
incidence in African Caribbean women is higher than the general population. Stroke burden
has major consequences for the physical, mental and social health of African Caribbean
women. In order to adjust to life after stroke individuals affected employ a range of strategies
which may include personal, religious (church) or spiritual support (i.e. prayer), individual
motivation, or resignation to life with a disability. This study explored these areas through the
coping mechanisms that African Caribbean women utilised post stroke in the context of stroke
recovery and lifestyle modification efforts needed to promote healthy living post stroke.
A qualitative approach using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was adopted. Eight
women were recruited into the study. Semi structured in-depth interviews were audio recorded
and were transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using a four-stage framework:
familiarisation, sense making, developing themes and data refinement and analysis.
Three main themes on coping emerged: the need to follow medical rules to manage stroke,
strength and determination, and the use of religion and faith to cope with life after stroke. These
findings illustrate both a tension between religious beliefs and the medical approach to stroke
and highlight the potential benefits that religion and the church can play in stroke recovery.
Implications for practice include acknowledgement and inclusion of religion and church based
health promotion in post stroke recovery.

JournalHealth and Social Care in the Community
Journal citation24 (6), pp. 769-778
ISSN09660410
Year2015
PublisherWiley
Accepted author manuscript
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1111/hsc.12256
Publication dates
Print21 Jun 2015
Publication process dates
Deposited12 Aug 2015
Accepted21 Apr 2015
Copyright informationThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Life after Stroke: Coping mechanisms among African Caribbean Women, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hsc.12256. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
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