Building secure attachments for primary school children: a mixed methods study

Article


Ubha, Neerose and Cahill, S. 2014. Building secure attachments for primary school children: a mixed methods study. Educational Psychology in Practice. 30 (3), pp. 272-292.
AuthorsUbha, Neerose and Cahill, S.
Abstract

Despite the wide implications of attachment theory there remains a lack of research exploring interventions which encapsulate the principles of an attachment-based framework in the school context. The aim of this research was to address this gap by implementing an intervention for a group of five primary-aged pupils with identified insecure attachment styles, and a key adult figure in the school context. The 10 week intervention consisted of weekly sessions based in a mainstream primary school. The research adopted a mixed methodology, with a predominant qualitative focus. The perceptions of children in relation to attachment concepts were explored both before and following the intervention. The findings revealed positive changes in the children’s behaviours and experiences, in that the children’s Internal Working Models were positively shifted, and impacted on their social and emotional behaviours.

JournalEducational Psychology in Practice
Journal citation30 (3), pp. 272-292
ISSN0266-7363
Year2014
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1080/02667363.2014.920304
Web address (URL)https://doi.org/10.1080/02667363.2014.920304
Publication dates
Online01 Aug 2014
Publication process dates
Deposited17 Dec 2018
Copyright information© 2014 Taylor & Francis. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Educational Psychology in Practice on 01/08/2014, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/02667363.2014.920304.
Permalink -

https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/85952

  • 6
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Related outputs

The impact of dynamic assessment: an exploration of the views of children, parents and teachers
Lawrence, Nicola and Cahill, S. 2014. The impact of dynamic assessment: an exploration of the views of children, parents and teachers. British Journal of Special Education. 41 (2), pp. 191-211.
Impact of stroke: a functional, psychological report of an inner-city multiracial population
Moorley, Calvin, Cahill, S., Tunariu, A. and Scott, Oona 2014. Impact of stroke: a functional, psychological report of an inner-city multiracial population. Primary Health Care. 24 (4), pp. 26-34.
Life after Stroke: Coping mechanisms among African Caribbean Women
Moorley, Calvin R., Cahill, S. and Corcoran, Nova T. 2015. Life after Stroke: Coping mechanisms among African Caribbean Women. Health and Social Care in the Community. 24 (6), pp. 769-778.
Managing meaning and belonging: young women’s negotiation of authenticity in body art
Riley, Sarah C.E. and Cahill, S. 2005. Managing meaning and belonging: young women’s negotiation of authenticity in body art. Journal of Youth Studies. 8 (3), pp. 261-279.