Salient Distractors Can Induce Saccade Adaptation

Article


Khan, Afsheen, McFadden, Sally A., Harwood, M. and Wallman, Josh 2014. Salient Distractors Can Induce Saccade Adaptation. Journal of Ophthalmology. 2014 (585792), pp. 1-11.
AuthorsKhan, Afsheen, McFadden, Sally A., Harwood, M. and Wallman, Josh
Abstract

When saccadic eye movements consistently fail to land on their intended target, saccade accuracy is maintained by gradually adapting the movement size of successive saccades. The proposed error signal for saccade adaptation has been based on the distance between where the eye lands and the visual target (retinal error). We studied whether the error signal could alternatively be based on the distance between the predicted and actual locus of attention after the saccade. Unlike conventional adaptation experiments that surreptitiously displace the target once a saccade is initiated towards it, we instead attempted to draw attention away from the target by briefly presenting salient distractor images on one side of the target after the saccade. To test whether less salient, more predictable distractors would induce less adaptation, we separately used fixed random noise distractors. We found that both visual attention distractors were able to induce a small degree of downward saccade adaptation but significantly more to the more salient distractors. As in conventional adaptation experiments, upward adaptation was less effective and salient distractors did not significantly increase amplitudes. We conclude that the locus of attention after the saccade can act as an error signal for saccade adaptation.

JournalJournal of Ophthalmology
Journal citation2014 (585792), pp. 1-11
ISSN2090-004X
2090-0058
Year2014
PublisherHindawi Publishing Corporation
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1155/2014/585792
Web address (URL)https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/585792
Publication dates
Print30 Apr 2014
Publication process dates
Deposited26 Jun 2017
Accepted11 Feb 2014
FunderNational Science Foundation
National Science Foundation
National Science Foundation
National Science Foundation
National Institute of Health
National Science Foundation
National Science Foundation
National Science Foundation
National Science Foundation
National Institutes of Health
Copyright information© 2014 The authors. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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