The Impact upon a Family of Having a Disabled Child

Article


Williams, G. 2021. The Impact upon a Family of Having a Disabled Child. Research in Teacher Education. 11 (2), pp. 18-23. https://doi.org/10.15123/uel.8q583
AuthorsWilliams, G.
Abstract

This research seeks to explore the impact of having a disabled sibling, with a focus on autism. This impact has often been overlooked, meaning there is a lack of research focused on siblings despite the challenges they face. The sample comprises five individuals from different families; four of the participants have a sibling with autism, and one participant has a sibling with Down syndrome. The study has taken an interpretivist approach using interviews and open-ended questionnaires to collect qualitative data. The chosen paradigm was the most appropriate when collecting and analysing experiences of individuals with disabled siblings. It employed mixed methods: semi-structured interviews were conducted, and each participant completed an open-ended questionnaire. The data were analysed using a thematic approach to identify six themes. The results showed that all the respondents agreed that their disabled sibling has impacted their life, but the overall impact was mixed, showing positives and negatives, although, more negatives were found. There was a detailed discussion on the participants' experiences. It is recommended that there should be further research conducted on siblings and more support given.

JournalResearch in Teacher Education
Journal citation11 (2), pp. 18-23
ISSN2046-1240
2047-3818
Year2021
PublisherThe School of Education and Communities, University of East London
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Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.15123/uel.8q583
Publication dates
OnlineNov 2021
Publication process dates
Deposited02 Mar 2022
Copyright holder© 2021 The Author
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