Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among Vietnamese adult employees

Article


Ho, N. T., Tran, M. T., Tran, C. T. D., Vanderbloemen, L., Pham, T. T., Hoang, L. B., Nguyen, Q. V., Dorn, J., Trevisan, M., Shu, X-O. and Le, L. C. 2023. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among Vietnamese adult employees. Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases. In Press. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2023.10.002
AuthorsHo, N. T., Tran, M. T., Tran, C. T. D., Vanderbloemen, L., Pham, T. T., Hoang, L. B., Nguyen, Q. V., Dorn, J., Trevisan, M., Shu, X-O. and Le, L. C.
Abstract

Background and Aims
Metabolic syndrome (MtS) is associated with increased risk of many health disorders, especially cardiovascular diseases. In Vietnam, study examining MtS is meager and especially lacking for the workforce. We estimated the prevalence of MtS and its associated factors among Vietnamese employees.

Methods and Results
We analyzed secondary data of annual health check of employees of 300 Vietnamese companies from the Vinmec Healthcare System. We used three definitions for MtS: International Diabetes Federation (IDF), National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III), and NCEP ATP III-Asia. Of 57,997 participants evaluated, 48.5% were males and 66.2% were younger than 40 years old. The unadjusted MtS prevalence was 8.4% (IDF), 10.2% (NCEP ATP III), and 16.0% (NCEP ATP III-Asia). The age-sex adjusted prevalence of MtS (NCEP ATP III-Asia) was 21.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 21.4%, 22.2%). MtS prevalence increased with age, reached 49.6% for age ≥60. The aging related increase was more remarkable in females than males (prevalence ratio (PR) (95% CI) for age ≥60 comparing to age <30 years old in males vs. females was 4.0 (3.6, 4.3) vs. 20.1 (17.7, 22.9)). High blood triglyceride (83.4%) and abdominal obesity (74.5%) were the predominant contributors to MtS.

Conclusion
In this relatively young Vietnamese working population, 16% had MtS with high triglyceride and abdominal obesity being the predominant contributors. These findings emphasize the need for developing effective high triglyceride and abdominal obesity prevention and control programs to curb the emerging epidemic of metabolic disorders in the workforce.

JournalNutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases
Journal citationIn Press
ISSN0939-4753
Year2023
PublisherElsevier
Accepted author manuscript
License
File Access Level
Anyone
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2023.10.002
Publication dates
Online06 Oct 2023
Publication process dates
Accepted01 Oct 2023
Deposited20 Nov 2023
Copyright holder© 2023, The Authors
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