Ambulatory blood pressure adaptations to high-intensity interval training: A randomized controlled study

Article


Edwards, J., Taylor, K, Cottam, C, Jalaludeen, N, Coleman, D, Wiles, J, Sharma, R and O'Driscoll, J. 2021. Ambulatory blood pressure adaptations to high-intensity interval training: A randomized controlled study. Journal of Hypertension. 39 (2), pp. 341-348. https://doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0000000000002630
AuthorsEdwards, J., Taylor, K, Cottam, C, Jalaludeen, N, Coleman, D, Wiles, J, Sharma, R and O'Driscoll, J.
Abstract

Objective:
Hypertension remains the leading cause of cardiovascular disease and premature mortality globally. Although high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is an effective nonpharmacological intervention for the reduction of clinic blood pressure (BP), very little research exists regarding its effects on ambulatory BP. The aim of this study was to measure alterations in ambulatory and clinic BP following HIIT in physically inactive adults.

Methods:
Forty-one participants (22.8 ± 2.7 years) were randomly assigned to a 4-week HIIT intervention or control group. The HIIT protocol was performed on a cycle ergometer set against a resistance of 7.5% bodyweight and consisted of 3 × 30-s maximal sprints separated with 2-min active recovery. Clinic and ambulatory BP was recorded pre and post the control period and HIIT intervention.

Results:
Following the HIIT intervention, 24-h ambulatory BP significantly decreased by 5.1 mmHg in sBP and 2.3 mmHg in dBP (P = 0.011 and 0.012, respectively), compared with the control group. In addition, clinic sBP significantly decreased by 6.6 mmHg compared with the control group (P = 0.021), with no significant changes in dBP and mean BP (mBP). Finally, 24-h ambulatory diastolic, daytime sBP, mBP and dBP, and night-time sBP and mBP variability significantly decreased post-HIIT compared with the control group.

Conclusion:
HIIT remains an effective intervention for the management of BP. Our findings support enduring BP reduction and improved BP variability, which are important independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

JournalJournal of Hypertension
Journal citation39 (2), pp. 341-348
ISSN0263-6352
1473-5598
Year2021
PublisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Accepted author manuscript
License
File Access Level
Anyone
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0000000000002630
Publication dates
PrintFeb 2021
Publication process dates
Accepted26 Jul 2020
Deposited20 May 2024
Copyright holder© 2021, Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.
Additional information

This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Journal of Hypertension. The published version of record, Edwards, Jamie J.; Taylor, Katrina A.; Cottam, Christian; Jalaludeen, Navazh; Coleman, Damian A.; Wiles, Jonathan D.; Sharma, Rajan; O’Driscoll, Jamie M. Ambulatory blood pressure adaptations to high-intensity interval training: a randomized controlled study. Journal of Hypertension 39(2):p 341-348, February 2021., is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0000000000002630

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Accepted author manuscript
Ambulatory HIIT Manuscript Final.pdf
License: All rights reserved
File access level: Anyone

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