CFT & people with intellectual disabilities

Article


Hardiman, Mark, Willmoth, Corrina and Walsh, J. 2018. CFT & people with intellectual disabilities. Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities. 12 (1), pp. 44-56.
AuthorsHardiman, Mark, Willmoth, Corrina and Walsh, J.
Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effects of compassion-focussed therapy (CFT) on anxiety in a small sample of adults with intellectual disability.
Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods design was employed. Participants (n=3) completed questionnaire measures of anxiety and self-compassion on three occasions: pre-intervention, post-intervention and, at three months follow-up. Post-intervention, they also took part in recorded interviews that were analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. Findings were then synthesised to develop a comprehensive understanding of their overall experience.
Findings

Final data synthesis revealed five themes: participant anxiety decreased (reliable for all participants); the faulty self; improved positive compassionate attitudes; increased sense of common humanity; and mindful distraction techniques.
Research limitations/implications

This research paper offers in-depth analysis of three participants’ experiences rather than reporting in less detail about a larger number of participants. The self-compassion scale required considerable support and reasonable adaptation to be used with these clients.
Originality/value

Only two other studies have explored the use of CFT with people with intellectual disabilities.

JournalAdvances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
Journal citation12 (1), pp. 44-56
ISSN2044-1282
Year2018
PublisherEmerald
Accepted author manuscript
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1108/AMHID-07-2017-0030
Web address (URL)https://doi.org/10.1108/AMHID-07-2017-0030
Publication dates
Online01 Feb 2018
Publication process dates
Deposited21 May 2018
Accepted17 Nov 2017
Accepted17 Nov 2017
Copyright information© 2018 Emerald
LicenseAll rights reserved
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https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/84905

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