Motivations for reducing alcohol consumption: An international survey exploring experiences that may lead to a change in drinking habits

Article


Davies, Emma L., Conroy, D., Winstock, Adam R. and Ferris, Jason 2017. Motivations for reducing alcohol consumption: An international survey exploring experiences that may lead to a change in drinking habits. Addictive Behaviors. 75, pp. 40-46.
AuthorsDavies, Emma L., Conroy, D., Winstock, Adam R. and Ferris, Jason
Abstract

Aims

Brief interventions delivered by doctors and other healthcare practitioners might be meaningfully enhanced by understanding what individual experiences might lead patients to cut down. The aim of the current paper was to explore the experiences that might lead people to reduce their alcohol consumption and to compare these findings between respondents from 21 different countries.
Methods

Global Drug Survey is an online cross sectional, opportunistic anonymous survey. This paper includes 72,209 respondents from 21 counties with over 250 respondents (60.8% male).
Results

Almost a third (32.9%) of participants reported that they would like to drink less alcohol over the next 12 months, and a third thought their GP would tell them to cut down if they were honest about their drinking. The primary experiences that were rated as most likely to lead to a change in behaviour were related to physical health, sexual assault and having to seek emergency medical treatment. Respondents from Germany were more likely to select embarrassment as a motivation to reduce drinking than those from other counties. Females were more likely to report indicate motivations related to sexual regret, sexual assault or seeking treatment. Older participants and those in the low risk audit category were more likely to report embarrassment or forgetfulness as potential motivation for change.
Conclusion

Understanding the different motivations that may lead individuals to change their drinking behaviours can be used to inform targeted brief interventions and targeted public health guidance.

JournalAddictive Behaviors
Journal citation75, pp. 40-46
ISSN03064603
Year2017
PublisherElsevier
Accepted author manuscript
License
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.06.019
Web address (URL)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.06.019
Publication dates
Online30 Jun 2017
Publication process dates
Deposited04 Apr 2018
Accepted29 Jun 2017
Accepted29 Jun 2017
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https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/84v3q

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