Possibilities and pitfalls? Moderate drinking and alcohol abstinence at home since the COVID-19 lockdown

Article


Nicholls, E. and Conroy, D. 2020. Possibilities and pitfalls? Moderate drinking and alcohol abstinence at home since the COVID-19 lockdown. International Journal of Drug Policy. 88 (Art. 103025). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugpo.2020.103025
AuthorsNicholls, E. and Conroy, D.
Abstract

The global ‘lockdowns’ and social distancing measures triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic have brought about unprecedented social changes, including the sudden, temporary closure of licensed venues and significant modifications to leisure and drinking practices. In this piece, we argue that these changes invite researchers to consider the short and longer-term consequences in terms of continuities and changes to the practices and symbolism of alcohol consumption both within and beyond domestic spaces. We do this by drawing on illustrations from our emergent qualitative research involving internet-mediated semi-structured and focus group interviews with 20 participants from the UK (aged 26-65) concerning experiences of drinking in and beyond ‘lockdown’. In sharing these early findings, we hope to highlight themes relevant to understanding drinking behaviour during the COVID-19 pandemic and to stimulate dialogue for immediate research priorities in this area. Key topic areas in our data appear to concern; variability in heavy/moderate/light/non-drinking practices while drinking at home, lockdown as an opportunity to reassess relationships with alcohol, and the symbolic role of alcohol in internet-mediated communications and interactions. Longstanding policymaker and practitioner concerns with managing public drinking and public order may have been unsettled by a growth in home-based drinking, although, as we argue, such changes were in motion before the global pandemic. We propose that a greater understanding of the challenges and opportunities the pandemic presents for (re)negotiating relationships with alcohol may offer wider lessons around how individuals and communities might be supported via innovative policy measures to change their relationships with alcohol both during and beyond lockdown.

JournalInternational Journal of Drug Policy
Journal citation88 (Art. 103025)
ISSN0955-3959
Year2020
PublisherElsevier
Accepted author manuscript
License
File Access Level
Anyone
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugpo.2020.103025
Publication dates
Online20 Nov 2020
Publication process dates
Accepted30 Oct 2020
Deposited20 Nov 2020
Copyright holder© 2020 Elsevier
Permalink -

https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/88v35

Restricted files

Accepted author manuscript

  • 12
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 9
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

A more fluid approach to drinking
Conroy, D. and Measham, Fiona 2020. A more fluid approach to drinking. The Psychologist. 33, pp. 52-55.
Imagery, Visualization, and Mental Simulation Interventions
Hagger, M. S. and Conroy, D. 2020. Imagery, Visualization, and Mental Simulation Interventions. in: Hagger, M. S., Cameron, L. D., Hamilton, K., Hankonen, N. and Lintunen, T. (ed.) The Handbook of Behavior Change Cambridge University Press. pp. 479-494
All in this together?
Conroy, D. and Nicholls, E. 2020. All in this together? The Psychologist.
‘Man up!’: Discursive constructions of non-drinkers among UK undergraduates
Conroy, D. and de Visser, Richard 2013. ‘Man up!’: Discursive constructions of non-drinkers among UK undergraduates. Journal of Health Psychology. 18 (11), pp. 1432-1444. https://doi.org/10.1177/1359105312463586
Being a non-drinking student: An interpretative phenomenological analysis
Conroy, D. and de Visser, Richard 2013. Being a non-drinking student: An interpretative phenomenological analysis. Psychology and Health. 29 (5), pp. 536-551. https://doi.org/10.1080/08870446.2013.866673
Efficacy of a non-drinking mental simulation intervention for reducing student alcohol consumption
Conroy, D., Sparks, Paul and de Visser, Richard 2015. Efficacy of a non-drinking mental simulation intervention for reducing student alcohol consumption. British Journal of Health Psychology. 20 (4), pp. 688-707. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjhp.12133
The importance of authenticity for student non-drinkers: An interpretative phenomenological analysis
Conroy, D. and de Visser, Richard 2015. The importance of authenticity for student non-drinkers: An interpretative phenomenological analysis. Journal of Health Psychology. 20 (11), pp. 1483-1493. https://doi.org/10.1177/1359105313514285
Motivations for reducing alcohol consumption: An international survey exploring experiences that may lead to a change in drinking habits
Davies, Emma L., Conroy, D., Winstock, Adam R. and Ferris, Jason 2017. Motivations for reducing alcohol consumption: An international survey exploring experiences that may lead to a change in drinking habits. Addictive Behaviors. 75, pp. 40-46. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.06.019
Imagery Interventions in Health Behavior: A Meta-Analysis
Conroy, D. and Hagger, Martin S. 2018. Imagery Interventions in Health Behavior: A Meta-Analysis. Health Psychology. 37 (7), pp. 668-679. https://doi.org/10.1037/hea0000625
Negative Experiences of Non-Drinking College Students in Great Britain: an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis
Jacobs, Lisa, Conroy, D. and Parke, Adrian 2018. Negative Experiences of Non-Drinking College Students in Great Britain: an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction. 16 (3), pp. 737-750. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11469-017-9848-6
Benefits and drawbacks of social non-drinking identified by British university students
Conroy, D. and de Visser, Richard O. 2017. Benefits and drawbacks of social non-drinking identified by British university students. Drug and Alcohol Review. 37 (S1), pp. S89-S97. https://doi.org/10.1111/dar.12610
Understanding the Association Between Relative Sociability Prototypes and University Students' Drinking Intention
Conroy, D. and de Visser, Richard 2016. Understanding the Association Between Relative Sociability Prototypes and University Students' Drinking Intention. Substance Use & Misuse. 51 (14), pp. 1831-1837. https://doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2016.1197939