‘Man up!’: Discursive constructions of non-drinkers among UK undergraduates

Article


Conroy, D. and de Visser, Richard 2013. ‘Man up!’: Discursive constructions of non-drinkers among UK undergraduates. Journal of Health Psychology. 18 (11), pp. 1432-1444.
AuthorsConroy, D. and de Visser, Richard
Abstract

This study adopted a discursive approach to explore how not drinking alcohol (non-drinking) is construed in relation to masculine identity among 12 undergraduate interviewees. Three prominent discourses were revealed. First, non-drinking was constructed as something strange requiring explanation. Second, contradictory discourses constructed non-drinking as, simultaneously, unsociable yet reflective of greater sociability. Third, non-drinking was constructed as something which has greater negative social consequences for men than for women. Opportunities for challenging traditional gender role expectations are considered.

JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Journal citation18 (11), pp. 1432-1444
ISSN1359-1053
Year2013
PublisherSAGE Publications
Accepted author manuscript
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1177/1359105312463586
Web address (URL)https://doi.org/10.1177/1359105312463586
Publication dates
Online27 Nov 2012
Print01 Nov 2013
Publication process dates
Deposited04 Apr 2018
Copyright informationConroy, Dominic and de Visser, Richard (2013) ‘‘Man up!’: Discursive constructions of non-drinkers among UK undergraduates’, Journal of Health Psychology, 18(11), pp. 1432-1444. Copyright © 2012 The authors. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.
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