Affect--or feeling (after Leys)

Article


Cromby, J. and Willis, M. 2016. Affect--or feeling (after Leys). Theory & Psychology. 26 (4), pp. 476-495.
AuthorsCromby, J. and Willis, M.
Abstract

In recent years the ‘affective turn’ has permeated the arts, humanities, social sciences, and psychology, but like any influential academic movement has not escaped critique. We outline and agree in general terms with the critique by Leys (2011b), which emphasises the influence of the basic emotion paradigm; the dualisms that accompany its deployment; and concerns regarding intentionality and meaning. We then propose an alternate approach to affect and feeling, derived from the philosophies of Whitehead and Langer; demonstrate how this avoids the endorsement of cognitivism to which Leys critique succumbs; illustrate the strengths of this approach with respect to analyses of former U.S. President Reagan; and highlight two strengths of affect theory which are compatible with it. We conclude that our approach closes the intentionality gap that Leys identifies whilst retaining a fruitful emphasis upon the affective realm.

JournalTheory & Psychology
Journal citation26 (4), pp. 476-495
ISSN1461-7447
0959-3543
Year2016
PublisherSAGE Publications
Accepted author manuscript
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1177/0959354316651344
Publication dates
Print02 Jun 2016
Publication process dates
Deposited08 Jun 2016
Accepted20 Mar 2016
Copyright informationCromby, J. and Willis, Martin E.H. (2016) ‘Affect--or feeling (after Leys)’, Theory & Psychology, 26(4), pp. 476-495. © 2016 The author. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.
LicenseAll rights reserved
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https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/8509w

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