The militarisation of English schools: Troops to Teaching and the implications for Initial Teacher Education and race equality

Article


Chadderton, C. 2013. The militarisation of English schools: Troops to Teaching and the implications for Initial Teacher Education and race equality. Race Ethnicity and Education. 17 (3), pp. 407-428.
AuthorsChadderton, C.
Abstract

This article considers the implications of the Troops to Teaching (TtT) programme, to be introduced in England in autumn 2013, for Initial Teacher Education (ITE) and race equality. TtT will fast-track ex-armed service members to teach in schools, without necessarily the requirement of a university degree. Employing theories of white supremacy, and Althusser’s (1971) concept of Ideological and Repressive State Apparatus, I argue that this initiative both stems from, and contributes to, a system of social privilege and oppression in education. Despite appearing to be aimed at all young people, the planned TtT initiative is actually aimed at poor and racially subordinated youth. This is likely to further entrench polarisation in a system which already provides two tier educational provision: TtT will be a programme for the inner-city disadvantaged, whilst wealthier, whiter schools will mostly continue to get highly qualified teachers. Moreover, TtT contributes to a wider devaluing of current ITE; ITE itself is rendered virtually irrelevant, as it seems TtT teachers will not be subject specialists, rather will be expected to provide military-style discipline, the skills for which they will be expected to bring with them. More sinister, I argue that TtT is part of the wider militarisation of education. This military-industrial-education complex seeks to contain and police young people who are marginalised along lines of race and class, and contributes to a wider move to increase ideological support for foreign wars - both aims ultimately in the service of neoliberal objectives which will feed social inequalities.

JournalRace Ethnicity and Education
Journal citation17 (3), pp. 407-428
ISSN1470-109X
1361-3324
Year2013
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY-ND
Publisher's version
License
CC BY-ND
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1080/13613324.2013.832937
Publication dates
Print07 Nov 2013
Publication process dates
Deposited04 Dec 2013
Copyright information"This is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article to be published in Race Ethnicity and Education [copyright Taylor & Francis], available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13613324.2013.832937"
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