All the young dudes: educational capital, masculinity and the uses of popular music

Article


Branch, A. 2012. All the young dudes: educational capital, masculinity and the uses of popular music. Popular Music. 31 (1), pp. 25-44.
AuthorsBranch, A.
Abstract

Since its emergence in the early seventies, glam rock has been theoretically categorised as a moment in British popular culture in which essentialist ideas about male gendered identity were rendered problematic for a popular music audience. Drawing on a Bourdieusian theoretical framework, the article argues that whilst this reading of glam is valid, insufficient attention has been given to an examination of the relevance of educational capital vis-à-vis the construction of self-identity in relation to glam. It is therefore concerned with raising questions about social class in addition to interrogating questions of gender. The article draws on the ethno-biographies of a sample of glam’s original working-class male fans; original interviews with musicians and writers associated with glam, as well as published biographical accounts. In doing so it contends that glam’s political significance is better understood as a moment in popular culture in which an educationally aspirant section of the male working-class sought to express its difference by identifying with the self-conscious performance of a more feminised masculinity it located in glam.

KeywordsGlam Rock; Masculinity; Educational capital; Bourdieu; Social class
JournalPopular Music
Journal citation31 (1), pp. 25-44
ISSN0261-1430
Year2012
PublisherCambridge University Press
Accepted author manuscript
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1017/S0261143011000444
Web address (URL)https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/popular-music/article/all-the-young-dudes-educational-capital-masculinity-and-the-uses-of-popular-music/3298D6913865D81667AF6B02CD540E15#fndtn-information
Publication dates
Print31 Jan 2012
Publication process dates
Deposited29 Mar 2018
Accepted01 Nov 2011
Accepted01 Nov 2011
Copyright information© Cambridge University Press 2012
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