Social networking technology: place and identity in mediated communities

Article


Goodings, L., Locke, Abigail and Brown, Steven D. 2007. Social networking technology: place and identity in mediated communities. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology. 17 (6), pp. 463-476.
AuthorsGoodings, L., Locke, Abigail and Brown, Steven D.
Abstract

This paper explores the rise of social networking technology as instances of mediated
communities. A dialectic between collectivity and place, resulting in the grounding of
a shared sense of the past in a particular place, is at the base of all communities. In
this sense community is, by its very definition, inherently ‘mediated’. We reformulate
the notion of a ‘virtual community’ to examine the particular modalities of mediation
across interactions occurring on Myspace. Data from two separate conversational
exchanges are taken from open access Myspace profiles. Drawing on an approach
broadly informed by the principles of Discursive Psychology (DP), we examine how
identity is constituted within interaction by drawing on symbolic resources. The
significance of place and off establishing a delicate relationship between the on-line
and off-line accomplishments is underlined. The paper develops the arguments of
Benwell & Stokoe (2006) and Dixon & Durrheim (2000) to arrive at an account of
‘place identity’ as the central dynamic in mediated community.

JournalJournal of Community & Applied Social Psychology
Journal citation17 (6), pp. 463-476
ISSN10991298
10529284
Year2007
PublisherWiley
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY-NC
Web address (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/casp.939
Publication dates
Print25 Oct 2007
Publication process dates
Deposited07 Dec 2015
Copyright informationThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Social networking technology: place and identity in mediated communities, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/casp.939. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
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