Maintaining an Interactionist Perspective of Undesirable Behaviour: What Is the Role of the Educational Psychologist?

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Cunningham, L. 2016. Maintaining an Interactionist Perspective of Undesirable Behaviour: What Is the Role of the Educational Psychologist? Educational Psychology Research and Practice. 2 (1), p. 49–58. https://doi.org/10.15123/uel.885v7
AuthorsCunningham, L.
Abstract

Special Educational Needs (SEN) legislation has recently undergone the largest reform in over a decade. Whilst several key changes have been widely discussed, the shift in terminology to describe children’s behavioural difficulties has received less attention. A greater emphasis has been placed on encouraging school staff and professionals to see beyond the observable behaviour and to give consideration to possible underpinning factors. However, the explicit focus on identifying undiagnosed learning difficulties, speech and language difficulties or mental health issues may serve to encourage a paradigm shift towards a more ‘within-child’ rather than interactionist perspective of undesirable behaviour. This paper will discuss this possibility, and with specific reference to speech and language difficulties, it will consider how through their five core functions educational psychologists can seek to maintain an interactionist perspective of undesirable behaviour.

JournalEducational Psychology Research and Practice
Journal citation2 (1), p. 49–58
ISSN2059-8963
Year2016
PublisherSchool of Psychology, University of East London
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Anyone
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.15123/uel.885v7
Publication dates
OnlineMar 2016
Publication process dates
Deposited11 Sep 2020
Copyright holder© 2016 The Author
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