What attracts people with disabilities to pursue a career in clinical psychology?

Article


Twena, Suzanne and Baker, M. 2013. What attracts people with disabilities to pursue a career in clinical psychology? For submission to Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy.
AuthorsTwena, Suzanne and Baker, M.
Abstract

Although exact numbers are not known, it is clear that the proportion of people with a disability within the UK clinical psychology workforce remains significantly less than within the UK population generally. The aim of this study was to investigate the attractiveness of clinical psychology to people living with a disability who are or are studying to become eligible to apply for professional psychology training. Q methodology was used to analyse patterns in the Q sorts of statements about recruitment incentives and disincentives of thirty three participants. From an exploratory factor analysis of ratings, four narrative interpretations are presented, one for each of four factors identified. Based upon high- and low-rated statements, each narrative demonstrates broad attraction to clinical psychology held in tension with various disincentives. The tensions generated by each narrative probably demand differing degrees of tolerance from potential recruits to apply for training. We conclude critically, wondering whether the profession’s disincentives outweigh its attractors for recruiting staff with a disability.
Key Practitioner Message:
• Appreciating how potential applicants with a disability may construe clinical psychology, is a step further towards realising a more representative workforce
• Self-examination by the UK clinical psychology profession is required to raise awareness of barriers, inadvertent or otherwise, to recruiting staff with a disability .

Keywordsclinical psychology; career attractors; disabled staff
JournalFor submission to Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
Year2013
PublisherWiley
File
License
CC BY
Publication process dates
Deposited13 Sep 2013
Submitted13 Sep 2013
Copyright information© The authors
Additional information

For submission to Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy

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https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/85w3x

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