Factors associated with choosing a career in clinical psychology: undergraduate minority ethnic perspectives

Article


Meredith, Emmeline and Baker, M. 2007. Factors associated with choosing a career in clinical psychology: undergraduate minority ethnic perspectives. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy. 14 (6), pp. 475-487.
AuthorsMeredith, Emmeline and Baker, M.
Abstract

Concerns have been expressed by clinical psychologists about the preponderance of white members of the profession. While studies of minority ethnic recruitment into health professions and entry into higher education have been conducted at undergraduate level, the extent to which their results can be mapped on to issues of minority ethnic choosing of postgraduate training in clinical psychology is unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the attraction or otherwise of professional clinical psychology to potential minority ethnic applicants. Q methodology was used to identify patterns of incentives and disincentives within a series of statements about the profession and its academic subject matter. Thirty-seven UK minority ethnic undergraduate psychology students completed Q-sort ratings. Along with narrative descriptions of seven factors derived from analysis of the data, we present three overall categories. Q-sort data are by design defined by positive and negative aspects, and our interpretations indicate a mixture of overall attraction in all three categories. These patterns of thinking extend what was known from previous research, and explicate something of the complexity of participants' views of clinical psychology. Within the constraints of the study's limitations, we view them as a small contribution towards an empirically based understanding of factors influential in the recruitment of an ethnically more representative workforce.

Keywordsethnic minorities; clinical psychology
JournalClinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
Journal citation14 (6), pp. 475-487
ISSN1063-3995
Year2007
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY-ND
Web address (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cpp.547
http://hdl.handle.net/10552/430
Publication dates
PrintDec 2007
Publication process dates
Deposited08 Dec 2009
Additional information

Citation:
Meredith, E; Baker, M. (2007) ‘Factors associated with choosing a career in clinical psychology - undergraduate minority ethnic perspectives’ Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy 14 (6) 475 - 487.

Permalink -

https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/865y5

Download files

Accepted author manuscript
  • 40
    total views
  • 112
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 1
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Women entering clinical psychology: Q-sort narratives of career attraction of female clinical psychology trainees in the UK
Baker, M. and Nash, Jen 2011. Women entering clinical psychology: Q-sort narratives of career attraction of female clinical psychology trainees in the UK. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy. 20, pp. 246-253.
What attracts people with disabilities to pursue a career in clinical psychology?
Twena, Suzanne and Baker, M. 2013. What attracts people with disabilities to pursue a career in clinical psychology? For submission to Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy.
Being backed up: accounts by adolescent Bangladeshi boys, of growing up in the East End of London
Wells, Jonathan and Baker, M. 2004. Being backed up: accounts by adolescent Bangladeshi boys, of growing up in the East End of London.
Changes in internal states across the binge–vomit cycle in bulimia nervosa
Corstorphine, Emma, Waller, Glenn, Ohanian, Vartouhi and Baker, M. 2006. Changes in internal states across the binge–vomit cycle in bulimia nervosa. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. 194 (6), pp. 446-449.
Stresses reported by UK trainee counselling psychologists
Kumary, Ajvir and Baker, M. 2008. Stresses reported by UK trainee counselling psychologists. Counselling Psychology Quarterly. 21 (1), pp. 19-28.
Men in a female-majority profession: perspectives of male trainees in clinical psychology
Caswell, Robert and Baker, M. 2008. Men in a female-majority profession: perspectives of male trainees in clinical psychology. Clinical Psychology Forum.