Women entering clinical psychology: Q-sort narratives of career attraction of female clinical psychology trainees in the UK

Article


Baker, M. and Nash, Jen 2011. Women entering clinical psychology: Q-sort narratives of career attraction of female clinical psychology trainees in the UK. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy. 20, pp. 246-253.
AuthorsBaker, M. and Nash, Jen
Abstract

The great majority of the UK clinical psychology workforce is female, and this fact prompted an examination of the various ways clinical psychology might be seen as attractive to women – a neglected research topic. Female clinical psychology trainees from a variety of training programmes Q-sorted statements of potential job attractors. The process of analysis is outlined, before most of the article is devoted to explicating the five narratives of attraction generated: making a difference, waiting for what I want, idealising challenge, identifying with distress, and acknowledging power and privilege. Two super-ordinate ‘stories’ spanning the narratives are suggested – an over-riding attraction to the profession, and a rebuttal of the suggestion that this attraction may be based on any overtly gendered grounds. In the absence of previous empirical data of women’s attraction to clinical psychology, the small but significant contribution to understanding the profession made by the analysis is acknowledged – as is the need for further research to confirm and develop the findings.

Keywordsclinical psychology; career attractors; female workforce
JournalClinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
Journal citation20, pp. 246-253
ISSN1099-0879
Year2011
PublisherWiley
File
License
CC BY
Publication dates
Print19 Sep 2011
Publication process dates
Deposited13 Sep 2013
Copyright information© The authors. The definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com
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https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/86060

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