Stresses reported by UK trainee counselling psychologists

Article


Kumary, Ajvir and Baker, M. 2008. Stresses reported by UK trainee counselling psychologists. Counselling Psychology Quarterly. 21 (1), pp. 19-28.
AuthorsKumary, Ajvir and Baker, M.
Abstract

This study examined stressors and psychological distress in 109 UK counselling psychology trainees. The research focus was two-fold. What is the profile of stressors that counselling psychology trainees report about the components of training? What relationship is there between this profile, and other characteristics of trainees, including their level of current psychological distress? Data from a stress survey and from the General Health Questionnaire were examined. High stress scores were found on three aspects of the stress survey ('academic', 'placements', 'personal and professional development'), but not-surprisingly-on the aspect, 'lack of support systems'. Significant stress differences were reported for gender and age of participants, and highly significant positive relationships were found between General Health Questionnaire and stress scores. Overall, the results suggest actions to be taken. Further research is needed to clarify unavoidable and avoidable stressors in training, and the reduction of trainees' experience of training stress to the necessary minimum needs to be adopted as an active target by programmes.

Keywordsstress; trainee counselling psychologists; General Health Questionnaire
JournalCounselling Psychology Quarterly
Journal citation21 (1), pp. 19-28
ISSN0951-5070
Year2008
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY-ND
Web address (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09515070801895626
http://hdl.handle.net/10552/429
Publication dates
PrintMar 2008
Publication process dates
Deposited08 Dec 2009
Additional information

Citation:
Kumary, A; Baker, M. (2008) ‘Stresses reported by UK trainee counselling psychologists’ Counselling Psychology Quarterly 21 (1) 19 - 28.

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https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/86548

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