High thought suppressors dream more of their negative waking-life experiences than low thought suppressors.

Article


Malinowski, J. 2017. High thought suppressors dream more of their negative waking-life experiences than low thought suppressors. Dreaming. 27 (4), pp. 269-277.
AuthorsMalinowski, J.
Abstract

Research has found that high thought suppressors dream more of their emotional waking-life experiences than low suppressors, in line with the dream rebound effect. The present study replicated and extended this finding. Participants (N=62) completed the White Bear Suppression Inventory (WBSI), the Pittsberg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS21), and answered questions about their Most Recent Dream. High thought suppressors dreamt more of their negative (but not positive) emotional experiences from waking-life than low thought suppressors. They also had poorer sleep quality, and higher levels of depression, anxiety, and stress. The results indicate a negative relationship between trait thought suppression and well-being. Identifying problematic suppressed thoughts in dream content may assist in generating insights into them and/or have therapeutic benefit.

JournalDreaming
Journal citation27 (4), pp. 269-277
ISSN1053-0797
Year2017
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association for International Association for the Study of Dreams
Accepted author manuscript
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1037/drm0000061
Web address (URL)https://doi.org/10.1037/drm0000061
Publication dates
Print09 Nov 2017
Publication process dates
Deposited16 Feb 2018
Accepted17 Aug 2017
Accepted17 Aug 2017
Copyright information© American Psychological Association, 2017. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at:10.1037/drm0000061
LicenseAll rights reserved
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