Insight from the Consideration of REM dreams, Non-REM Dreams and Daydreams

Article


Blagrove, Mark T., Edwards, Chris, van Rijn, Elaine, Reid, Alex, Malinowski, J., Bennett, Paul, Carr, Michelle, Eichenlaub, Jean-Baptiste, McGee, Shauna, Evans, Katie and Ruby, Perrine 2018. Insight from the Consideration of REM dreams, Non-REM Dreams and Daydreams. Psychology of Consciousness: Theory, Research, and Practice. 6 (2), pp. 138-162.
AuthorsBlagrove, Mark T., Edwards, Chris, van Rijn, Elaine, Reid, Alex, Malinowski, J., Bennett, Paul, Carr, Michelle, Eichenlaub, Jean-Baptiste, McGee, Shauna, Evans, Katie and Ruby, Perrine
Abstract

Throughout history there have been reports and claims that consideration of dreams can
produce personal realizations and insight. We assessed Exploration-Insight scores associated
with discussing Rapid Eye Movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) dreams in connection
with recent waking life experiences. Thirty-one participants were cued in the sleep
laboratory for a daydream report and then awakened from REM and N2 sleep for dream
reports. Participants subsequently discussed each of their dream and daydream reports for
30-40 minutes with two experimenters, following the structured Ullman (1996) dream
group discussion procedure. Participants assessed the benefit of discussing the reports by
completing the Gains from (Day)Dream Interpretation (G(D)DI) questionnaire. We found no
difference in G(D)DI scores between discussing REM and N2 dream reports, and no
difference between dream and daydream discussions in engagement and thoroughness of
exploring the reports. However, discussing dream reports produced higher scores on the
G(D)DI Exploration-Insight subscale compared with discussing daydream reports. Significant
differences were evident in items reflecting the learning of what the report means in terms
of waking life issues. Frontal theta prior to waking from N2 was significantly associated with
Exploration-Insight score obtained after N2 dream discussion, but this relationship was not
found for REM dreams. The findings of high ratings of Exploration-Insight after discussing
dreams were evident even though participants did not select the dream, unlike what can
occur for home recorded dreams, and even though discussion was brief. We suggest that
insight might be produced by embodied and metaphorical thinking in dreams.

JournalPsychology of Consciousness: Theory, Research, and Practice
Journal citation6 (2), pp. 138-162
ISSN2326-5523
Year2018
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association
Accepted author manuscript
License
File Access Level
Anyone
Supplemental file
Supplemental file
Supplemental file
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1037/cns0000167
Web address (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cns0000167
Publication dates
Online17 Dec 2018
Publication process dates
Deposited02 Aug 2018
Accepted23 Jul 2018
Accepted23 Jul 2018
FunderBial Foundation
Bial Foundation
Copyright information© 2018 American Psychological Association. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cns0000167.
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