Cognitive Enhancement and Social Mobility: Skepticism from India

Article


Dasgupta, J., Lockwood Estrin, G., Summers, J. and Singh, I. 2022. Cognitive Enhancement and Social Mobility: Skepticism from India. AJOB Neuroscience. https://doi.org/10.1080/21507740.2022.2048723
AuthorsDasgupta, J., Lockwood Estrin, G., Summers, J. and Singh, I.
Abstract

Cognitive enhancement (CE) covers a broad spectrum of methods, including behavioral techniques, nootropic drugs, and neuromodulation interventions. However, research on their use in children has almost exclusively been carried out in high-income countries with limited understanding of how experts working with children view their use in low- and middle- income countries (LMICs). This study examines perceptions on cognitive enhancement, their techniques, neuroethical issues about their use from an LMICs perspective.

Seven Indian experts were purposively sampled for their expertise in bioethics, child development and child education. In-depth interviews were conducted using a semi-structured topic guide to examine (1) understanding of CE, (2) which approaches were viewed as cognitive enhancers, (3) attitudes toward different CE techniques and (4) neuroethical issues related to CE use within the Indian context. All interviews were audio recorded and transcribed before thematic analysis.

Findings indicate Indian experts view cognitive enhancement as a holistic positive impact on overall functioning and well-being, rather than improvement in specific cognitive abilities. Exogenous agents, and neuromodulation were viewed with skepticism, whereas behavioral approaches were viewed more favorably. Neuroethical concerns included equitable access to CE, limited scientific evidence and over-reliance on technology to address societal problems. This highlights the need for more contextually relevant neuroethics research in LMICs.

Journal AJOB Neuroscience
ISSN2150-7759
Year2022
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Accepted author manuscript
License
File Access Level
Anyone
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/21507740.2022.2048723
Publication dates
Online21 Mar 2022
Publication process dates
Deposited10 Aug 2022
Copyright holder© 2022 Taylor & Francis
Additional information

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in AJOB Neuroscience on 21 Mar 2022, available at: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/21507740.2022.2048723

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