Choice of device to view video lectures: an analysis of two independent cohorts of first-year university students

Article


Namuddu, J. and Watts, P. 2020. Choice of device to view video lectures: an analysis of two independent cohorts of first-year university students. Research in Learning Technology. 28 (Art. 2324). https://doi.org/10.25304/rlt.v28.2324
AuthorsNamuddu, J. and Watts, P.
Abstract

Video lectures and mobile learning devices have become prominent, but little is known about device choices for watching video lectures. The setting for this study, a university that provided perpetual access to personal computers and free tablet devices to all first-year students, provided a unique opportunity to study device choice in a setting where both tablets and personal computers were perpetually available. Weekly video lectures on a first-year module were made from October to April in two independent cohorts of students. YouTube analytics were used to record data on device usage for video lecture views. Tablets were initially used for almost 70% of views. However, tablet usage declined throughout the academic year, and tablets were overtaken by personal computers as the preferred device in the second half of the academic year. Findings suggest that an initial preference for using tablets to view video lectures lasts only a few months.

JournalResearch in Learning Technology
Journal citation28 (Art. 2324)
ISSN2156-7069
Year2020
PublisherAssociation for Learning Technology
Publisher's version
License
File Access Level
Anyone
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.25304/rlt.v28.2324
Web address (URL)https://doi.org/10.25304/rlt.v28.2324
Publication dates
Online05 Feb 2020
Publication process dates
Accepted14 Jan 2020
Deposited06 Feb 2020
Copyright holder© 2020 The Authors
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