Why teachers need to hear the voice and experience of the child with dyspraxia

Article


Edmonds, C. 2013. Why teachers need to hear the voice and experience of the child with dyspraxia. Research in Teacher Education. 3 (1), pp. 5-10.
AuthorsEdmonds, C.
Abstract

This article discusses the literature on children in research, pupil participation and the voice of the child. The need for individual experience and children’s voice in research is explored, with the focus placed on children with dyspraxia in UK schools. The article addresses previous literature in the area which shows that teachers’ knowledge and understanding of the disorder is generally poor, such that these children remain an ‘educational underclass’. It is suggested that this can have some very significant outcomes for these children, such as low self-esteem and confidence, increased delinquency and increased unemployment. This paper argues that by gaining more knowledge and understanding by listening to the voices and lived experiences of children with dyspraxia, teachers will be better placed to provide an educational environment that is enriching and inclusive for all children, one in which those with dyspraxia will be actively able to participate and no longer remain an educational underclass.

KeywordsDyspraxia; Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD); lived experience; voice
JournalResearch in Teacher Education
Research in Teacher Education
Journal citation3 (1), pp. 5-10
ISSN2047-3818
Year2013
PublisherUniversity of East London, Cass School of Education and Communities
Publisher's version
License
CC BY-ND
Publication dates
Print01 Apr 2013
Publication process dates
Deposited21 May 2013
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https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/85x8v

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