‘It’s like working away for two weeks’: The harms associated with young drug dealers commuting from a saturated London drug market

Article


Windle, J. and Briggs, Daniel 2015. ‘It’s like working away for two weeks’: The harms associated with young drug dealers commuting from a saturated London drug market. Crime Prevention and Community Safety. 17 (2), pp. 105-119.
AuthorsWindle, J. and Briggs, Daniel
Abstract

This paper discusses some new developments
in British illicit drug markets: the
commuting of London-based gang members to sell
drugs in other British towns, or in
gang member's parlance: 'working the country
lines'. This is concerning for several
reasons, not least because children and young people may be running away from home
and putting themselves at significant risk
by dealing drugs; includi
ng involvement in the
distribution of drugs from 'crack houses'.
This paper hypothesises that the increased
saturation of London drug markets is increas
ing the chances of drug dealers commuting
from their homes which in turn raises pa
rticular harms, including conflict with
established dealers in other cities as well as
child welfare issues. The paper concludes
with some policy and research recommendations.

JournalCrime Prevention and Community Safety
Journal citation17 (2), pp. 105-119
ISSN1743-4629
1460-3780
Year2015
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY
Web address (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/cpcs.2015.2
Publication dates
Print01 May 2015
Publication process dates
Deposited26 Oct 2015
Copyright informationThis is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in Crime Prevention and Community Safety. The definitive publisher-authenticated version is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/cpcs.2015.2
Permalink -

https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/8562w

  • 28
    total views
  • 108
    total downloads
  • 4
    views this month
  • 14
    downloads this month

Related outputs

Security trumps drug control: How securitization explains drug policy paradoxes in Thailand and Vietnam
Windle, J. 2016. Security trumps drug control: How securitization explains drug policy paradoxes in Thailand and Vietnam. Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy. 23 (4), pp. 344-354.
Tuckers firm: a case study of British organised crime
Windle, J. 2013. Tuckers firm: a case study of British organised crime. Trends in Organized Crime. 16 (4), pp. 382-396.
How the East Influenced Drug Prohibition
Windle, J. 2013. How the East Influenced Drug Prohibition. The International History Review. 35 (5), pp. 1185-1199.
A Slow March from Social Evil to Harm Reduction: Drugs and Drug Policy in Vietnam
Windle, J. 2015. A Slow March from Social Evil to Harm Reduction: Drugs and Drug Policy in Vietnam. Journal of Drug Policy Analysis. 2015.
Preventing the diversion of Turkish opium
Windle, J. 2016. Preventing the diversion of Turkish opium. Security Journal. 29 (2), pp. 213-227.
Going solo: the social organisation of drug dealing within a London street gang
Windle, J. and Briggs, Daniel 2015. Going solo: the social organisation of drug dealing within a London street gang. Journal of Youth Studies. 18 (9), pp. 1170-1185.
Popping the Balloon Effect: Assessing Drug Law Enforcement in Terms of Displacement, Diffusion, and the Containment Hypothesis
Windle, J. and Farrell, Graham 2012. Popping the Balloon Effect: Assessing Drug Law Enforcement in Terms of Displacement, Diffusion, and the Containment Hypothesis. Substance Use & Misuse. 47 (8-9), pp. 868-876.
The suppression of illicit opium production in Viet Nam: an introductory narrative
Windle, J. 2012. The suppression of illicit opium production in Viet Nam: an introductory narrative. Crime, Law and Social Change. 57 (4), pp. 425-439.
Harms caused by China's 1906–17 opium suppression intervention
Windle, J. 2013. Harms caused by China's 1906–17 opium suppression intervention. International Journal of Drug Policy. 24 (5), pp. 498-505.
A very gradual suppression: A history of Turkish opium controls, 1933-1974
Windle, J. 2014. A very gradual suppression: A history of Turkish opium controls, 1933-1974. European Journal of Criminology. 11 (2), pp. 195-212.
Poppies for Medicine in Afghanistan: Lessons from India and Turkey
Windle, J. 2011. Poppies for Medicine in Afghanistan: Lessons from India and Turkey. Journal of Asian and African Studies. 46 (6), pp. 663-677.
Insights for Contemporary Drug Policy: A Historical Account of Opium Control in India and Pakistan
Windle, J. 2012. Insights for Contemporary Drug Policy: A Historical Account of Opium Control in India and Pakistan. Asian Journal of Criminology. 7 (1), pp. 55-74.
Afghanistan, Narcotics and the International Criminal Court: From Port of Spain to Kabul, via Rome.
Windle, J. 2012. Afghanistan, Narcotics and the International Criminal Court: From Port of Spain to Kabul, via Rome. European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice. 20 (3), pp. 297-314.
Ominous Parallels and Optimistic Differences: Opium in China and Afghanistan
Windle, J. 2011. Ominous Parallels and Optimistic Differences: Opium in China and Afghanistan. Law, Crime and History. 1 (2), pp. 141-164.