The suppression of illicit opium production in Viet Nam: an introductory narrative

Article


Windle, J. 2012. The suppression of illicit opium production in Viet Nam: an introductory narrative. Crime, Law and Social Change. 57 (4), pp. 425-439.
AuthorsWindle, J.
Abstract

Between 1990 and 2001, Vietnamese opium production declined by 98%: the causes of this
reduction have received minimal academic attention. As Viet Nam is one of only a handful of
states which have successfully suppressed illicit opium production, the somewhat surprising
lack of scholarly attention represents an underutilised opportunity. As such, this paper
represents the first step towards rectifying this gap in the knowledge base. The available
evidence suggests that a number of components converged to permit suppression: (1) The
state possessed authority over the majority of its territory; (2) The state placed opium farmers
under extensive surveillance; (3) The state possessed leverage (rural development and law
enforcement) in negotiations for ‘voluntary’ eradication; (4) The elite perceived suppression
as in their best interest. Additionally, while the state pledged support to develop alternative
livelihoods, few farmers received state assistance. This would suggest that disentives, rather
than the establishment of alternative incomes, were the primary motivation for the cessation
of opium production. While Viet Nam was successful in suppressing illicit opium production,
the negative impact of the intervention on (ex)-opium farmers and their communities
demonstrate the limitation of the Vietnamese approach.

JournalCrime, Law and Social Change
Journal citation57 (4), pp. 425-439
ISSN1573-0751
0925-4994
Year2012
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY
Web address (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10611-012-9364-3
Publication dates
Print10 Feb 2012
Publication process dates
Deposited15 Jul 2015
Accepted10 Feb 2012
Copyright informationThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10611-012-9364-3
Permalink -

https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/85z81

  • 4
    total views
  • 35
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 9
    downloads this month

Related outputs

Security trumps drug control: How securitization explains drug policy paradoxes in Thailand and Vietnam
Windle, J. 2016. Security trumps drug control: How securitization explains drug policy paradoxes in Thailand and Vietnam. Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy. 23 (4), pp. 344-354.
Tuckers firm: a case study of British organised crime
Windle, J. 2013. Tuckers firm: a case study of British organised crime. Trends in Organized Crime. 16 (4), pp. 382-396.
How the East Influenced Drug Prohibition
Windle, J. 2013. How the East Influenced Drug Prohibition. The International History Review. 35 (5), pp. 1185-1199.
A Slow March from Social Evil to Harm Reduction: Drugs and Drug Policy in Vietnam
Windle, J. 2015. A Slow March from Social Evil to Harm Reduction: Drugs and Drug Policy in Vietnam. Journal of Drug Policy Analysis. 2015.
Preventing the diversion of Turkish opium
Windle, J. 2016. Preventing the diversion of Turkish opium. Security Journal. 29 (2), pp. 213-227.
Going solo: the social organisation of drug dealing within a London street gang
Windle, J. and Briggs, Daniel 2015. Going solo: the social organisation of drug dealing within a London street gang. Journal of Youth Studies. 18 (9), pp. 1170-1185.
‘It’s like working away for two weeks’: The harms associated with young drug dealers commuting from a saturated London drug market
Windle, J. and Briggs, Daniel 2015. ‘It’s like working away for two weeks’: The harms associated with young drug dealers commuting from a saturated London drug market. Crime Prevention and Community Safety. 17 (2), pp. 105-119.
Popping the Balloon Effect: Assessing Drug Law Enforcement in Terms of Displacement, Diffusion, and the Containment Hypothesis
Windle, J. and Farrell, Graham 2012. Popping the Balloon Effect: Assessing Drug Law Enforcement in Terms of Displacement, Diffusion, and the Containment Hypothesis. Substance Use & Misuse. 47 (8-9), pp. 868-876.
Harms caused by China's 1906–17 opium suppression intervention
Windle, J. 2013. Harms caused by China's 1906–17 opium suppression intervention. International Journal of Drug Policy. 24 (5), pp. 498-505.
A very gradual suppression: A history of Turkish opium controls, 1933-1974
Windle, J. 2014. A very gradual suppression: A history of Turkish opium controls, 1933-1974. European Journal of Criminology. 11 (2), pp. 195-212.
Poppies for Medicine in Afghanistan: Lessons from India and Turkey
Windle, J. 2011. Poppies for Medicine in Afghanistan: Lessons from India and Turkey. Journal of Asian and African Studies. 46 (6), pp. 663-677.
Insights for Contemporary Drug Policy: A Historical Account of Opium Control in India and Pakistan
Windle, J. 2012. Insights for Contemporary Drug Policy: A Historical Account of Opium Control in India and Pakistan. Asian Journal of Criminology. 7 (1), pp. 55-74.
Afghanistan, Narcotics and the International Criminal Court: From Port of Spain to Kabul, via Rome.
Windle, J. 2012. Afghanistan, Narcotics and the International Criminal Court: From Port of Spain to Kabul, via Rome. European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice. 20 (3), pp. 297-314.
Ominous Parallels and Optimistic Differences: Opium in China and Afghanistan
Windle, J. 2011. Ominous Parallels and Optimistic Differences: Opium in China and Afghanistan. Law, Crime and History. 1 (2), pp. 141-164.