Going solo: the social organisation of drug dealing within a London street gang

Article


Windle, J. and Briggs, Daniel 2015. Going solo: the social organisation of drug dealing within a London street gang. Journal of Youth Studies. 18 (9), pp. 1170-1185.
AuthorsWindle, J. and Briggs, Daniel
Abstract

This paper presents a single case study of one street gang in one London borough. Semistructured
interviews were conducted with 12 gang members, or former gang members, and
seven practitioners. The practitioners and gang members / ex-gang members reported
different perspectives on how the gang was structured and drug dealing was organised. The
gang members / ex-gang members suggested that the gang is a loose social network with little
recognisable formal organisation. Although individual gang members sell drugs, the gang
should not be viewed as a drug dealing organisation. Rather it is a composition of individual
drug dealers who cooperate out of mutual self-interest. Therefore, some gang members are
best described as independent entrepreneurs while others are subcontractors looking to 'go
solo'. The seven practitioners, however, tended to describe a more hierarchically structured
gang, with formal recruitment processes. This divergence of perspective highlights an
important consideration for policy and research.

JournalJournal of Youth Studies
Journal citation18 (9), pp. 1170-1185
ISSN1469-9680
1367-6261
Year2015
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY
Web address (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13676261.2015.1020925
Publication dates
Print2015
Publication process dates
Deposited26 Oct 2015
Accepted16 Feb 2015
Copyright informationThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Youth Studies on 11.03.15, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13676261.2015.1020925
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