The frontline of social prescribing – how do we ensure Link Workers can work safely and effectively within primary care?

Article


Frostick, C. and Bertotti, M. 2019. The frontline of social prescribing – how do we ensure Link Workers can work safely and effectively within primary care? Chronic Illness.
AuthorsFrostick, C. and Bertotti, M.
Abstract

Objective
To identify the training, skills and experience social prescribing Link Workers, working with patients presenting with long term conditions, need to carry out their role safely and effectively with in primary care services.
Method
Qualitative data were collected from Link Workers as part of the evaluation of three social prescribing schemes. Interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed.
Results
Link Workers describe the complexity of the work and the need to define the boundaries of their role within existing services. Previous life and work experience were invaluable and empathy was seen as a key skill. A variety of training was valued with counselling skills felt to be most critical. Clinical supervision and support were felt to be essential to conduct the work safely.
Discussion
Social prescribing is a significant theme within UK health policy and internationally and schemes in primary care services are common. Patient accounts consistently suggest that the Link Worker is key to the success of the pathway. Link Workers can facilitate positive behaviour change, however they must be recruited, trained and supported with a clear understanding of the demands of this complex role.

JournalChronic Illness
ISSN1742-3953
Year2019
PublisherSAGE Publications
Accepted author manuscript
License
File Access Level
Anyone
Publication process dates
Accepted03 Sep 2019
Deposited03 Sep 2019
Copyright holder© 2019 The Authors
Copyright informationThis is the Accepted Manuscript for publication in Chronic Illness. Frostick, C., Bertotti, M., 'The frontline of social prescribing – how do we ensure Link Workers can work safely and effectively within primary care?', Chronic Illness, (In Press) pp. xx-xx. DOI: [DOI number].
Permalink -

https://repository.uel.ac.uk/item/86z84

  • 4
    total views
  • 4
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 1
    downloads this month

Related outputs

The impact of a social prescribing service on patients in primary care: a mixed methods evaluation
Carnes, Dawn, Sohanpal, Ratna, Frostick, C., Hull, Sally, Mathur, Rohini, Netuveli, G., Tong, Jin, Hutt, Patrick and Bertotti, M. 2017. The impact of a social prescribing service on patients in primary care: a mixed methods evaluation. BMC Health Services Research. 17, p. Art. 835.
Social Prescribing in General Practice
Frostick, C. and Bertotti, M. 2019. Social Prescribing in General Practice. British Journal of General Practice.
Investing resources to address social factors affecting health: The essential role of social prescribing
Jani, A., Bertotti, M., Lazzari, A., Drinkwater, C., Addarii, F., Conibear, J. and Gray, M. 2019. Investing resources to address social factors affecting health: The essential role of social prescribing. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.
A realist evaluation of social prescribing: an exploration into the context and mechanisms underpinning a pathway linking primary care with the voluntary sector
Bertotti, M., Frostick, C., Hutt, Patrick, Sohanpal, Ratna and Carnes, Dawn 2018. A realist evaluation of social prescribing: an exploration into the context and mechanisms underpinning a pathway linking primary care with the voluntary sector. Primary Health Care Research & Development. 19 (3), pp. 232-245.
A review of the evidence assessing impact of social prescribing on healthcare demand and cost implications
Polley, Marie, Bertotti, M., Kimberlee, Richard and Pilkington, K. 2017. A review of the evidence assessing impact of social prescribing on healthcare demand and cost implications. University of Westminster.
Workplace well-being in the London-Chinese business community
Bertotti, M., Dan-Ogosi, I. and Rao, Mala 2017. Workplace well-being in the London-Chinese business community. International Journal of Workplace Health Management. 10 (2), pp. 86-100.
Types of Social Capital and Mental Disorder in Deprived Urban Areas: A Multilevel Study of 40 Disadvantaged London Neighbourhoods
Bertotti, M., Watts, Paul, Netuveli, G., Yu, Ge, Schmidt, Elena, Tobi, P., Lais, Shahana and Renton, A. 2013. Types of Social Capital and Mental Disorder in Deprived Urban Areas: A Multilevel Study of 40 Disadvantaged London Neighbourhoods. PLOS ONE. 8 (12), p. e80127.
Key barriers to community cohesion: views from residents of 20 London deprived neighbourhoods
Bertotti, M., Adams-Eaton, F., Sheridan, K. and Renton, A. 2011. Key barriers to community cohesion: views from residents of 20 London deprived neighbourhoods. GeoJournal. 47 (2), pp. 168-183.
The contribution of a social enterprise to the building of social capital in a disadvantaged urban area of London
Bertotti, M., Harden, A., Renton, A. and Sheridan, K. 2012. The contribution of a social enterprise to the building of social capital in a disadvantaged urban area of London. Community Development Journal. 47 (2), pp. 168-183.
Reconsidering private sector engagement in subnational economic governance
Syrett, Stephen and Bertotti, M. 2012. Reconsidering private sector engagement in subnational economic governance. Environment and Planning A. 44 (10), pp. 2310-2326.
A multilevel analysis of the association between social networks and support on leisure time physical activity: evidence from 40 disadvantaged areas in London
Yu, Ge, Renton, A., Schmidt, Elena, Tobi, Patrick, Bertotti, M., Watts, P. and Lais, Shahana 2011. A multilevel analysis of the association between social networks and support on leisure time physical activity: evidence from 40 disadvantaged areas in London. Health & Place. 17 (5), pp. 1023-1029.